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chateau
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A Tale of Two Cities
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chateau -- (French)
Used In
A Tale of Two Cities
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  • A supper-table was laid for two, in the third of the rooms; a round room, in one of the chateau’s four extinguisher-topped towers.
  • It came on briskly, and came up to the front of the chateau.
  • It would have been of as much avail to interrogate any stone face outside the chateau as to interrogate that face of his.
  • For three heavy hours, the stone faces of the chateau, lion and human, stared blindly at the night.
  • Then, the grey water of both began to be ghostly in the light, and the eyes of the stone faces of the chateau were opened.
  • In the glow, the water of the chateau fountain seemed to turn to blood, and the stone faces crimsoned.
  • The chateau awoke later, as became its quality, but awoke gradually and surely.
  • It was a heavy mass of building, that chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, with a large stone courtyard before it, and two stone sweeps of staircase meeting in a stone terrace before the principal door.
  • The fountain in the village flowed unseen and unheard, and the fountain at the chateau dropped unseen and unheard—both melting away, like the minutes that were falling from the spring of Time— through three dark hours.
  • The shadow of a large high-roofed house, and of many over-hanging trees, was upon Monsieur the Marquis by that time; and the shadow was exchanged for the light of a flambeau, as his carriage stopped, and the great door of his chateau was opened to him.
  • Some of the people of the chateau, and some of those of the posting-house, and all the taxing authorities, were armed more or less, and were crowded on the other side of the little street in a purposeless way, that was highly fraught with nothing.
  • Surely, not so the ringing of the great bell of the chateau, nor the running up and down the stairs; nor the hurried figures on the terrace; nor the booting and tramping here and there and everywhere, nor the quick saddling of horses and riding away?
  • It portended that there was one stone face too many, up at the chateau.
  • "The chateau, and all the race?" inquired the first.
  • "The chateau and all the race," returned Defarge.
  • Presently, the chateau began to make itself strangely visible by some light of its own, as though it were growing luminous.
  • The rider from the chateau, and the horse in a foam, clattered away through the village, and galloped up the stony steep, to the prison on the crag.
  • The chateau is on fire; valuable objects may be saved from the flames by timely aid!
  • The chateau was left to itself to flame and burn.
  • The valet had put her away from the door, the carriage had broken into a brisk trot, the postilions had quickened the pace, she was left far behind, and Monseigneur, again escorted by the Furies, was rapidly diminishing the league or two of distance that remained between him and his chateau.
  • The trees environing the old chateau, keeping its solitary state apart, moved in a rising wind, as though they threatened the pile of building massive and dark in the gloom.
  • If a picture of the chateau as it was to be a very few years hence, and of fifty like it as they too were to be a very few years hence, could have been shown to him that night, he might have been at a loss to claim his own from the ghastly, fire-charred, plunder-wrecked rains.
  • The chateau burned; the nearest trees, laid hold of by the fire, scorched and shrivelled; trees at a distance, fired by the four fierce figures, begirt the blazing edifice with a new forest of smoke.
  • Chateau and hut, stone face and dangling figure, the red stain on the stone floor, and the pure water in the village well—thousands of acres of land—a whole province of France—all France itself—lay under the night sky, concentrated into a faint hair-breadth line.
  • Probably, Monsieur Gabelle passed a long night up there, with the distant chateau for fire and candle, and the beating at his door, combined with the joy-ringing, for music; not to mention his having an ill-omened lamp slung across the road before his posting-house gate, which the village showed a lively inclination to displace in his favour.
  • But, he had not yet spoken to her on the subject; the assassination at the deserted chateau far away beyond the heaving water and the long, long, dusty roads—the solid stone chateau which had itself become the mere mist of a dream—had been done a year, and he had never yet, by so much as a single spoken word, disclosed to her the state of his heart.
  • But, he had not yet spoken to her on the subject; the assassination at the deserted chateau far away beyond the heaving water and the long, long, dusty roads—the solid stone chateau which had itself become the mere mist of a dream—had been done a year, and he had never yet, by so much as a single spoken word, disclosed to her the state of his heart.
  • Madame Defarge and monsieur her husband returned amicably to the bosom of Saint Antoine, while a speck in a blue cap toiled through the darkness, and through the dust, and down the weary miles of avenue by the wayside, slowly tending towards that point of the compass where the chateau of Monsieur the Marquis, now in his grave, listened to the whispering trees.

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    Show samples from other sources
  • She restored the chateau and turned it into a small hotel.
  • The chateau has a small vineyard.

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