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rustic
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A Tale of Two Cities
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rustic
Used In
A Tale of Two Cities
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  • At the steepest point of the hill there was a little burial-ground, with a Cross and a new large figure of Our Saviour on it; it was a poor figure in wood, done by some inexperienced rustic carver, but he had studied the figure from the life—his own life, maybe—for it was dreadfully spare and thin.
  • It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrils of the Revolution.
  • With his straw in his mouth, Mr. Cruncher sat watching the two streams, like the heathen rustic who has for several centuries been on duty watching one stream—saving that Jerry had no expectation of their ever running dry.
  • Like the fabled rustic who raised the Devil with infinite pains, and was so terrified at the sight of him that he could ask the Enemy no question, but immediately fled; so, Monseigneur, after boldly reading the Lord’s Prayer backwards for a great number of years, and performing many other potent spells for compelling the Evil One, no sooner beheld him in his terrors than he took to his noble heels.
  • There was a murmur of confidence and approval, and then the man who hungered, asked: "Is this rustic to be sent back soon?

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    Show samples from other sources
  • Low-slung brown leather couches with modern lines were coupled with a rustic coffee table on a cow-skin rug.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Longest Ride
  • It seemed excessively rustic, even for Cairnholm.
    Ransom Riggs  --  Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

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