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entreat
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A Tale of Two Cities
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entreat
Used In
A Tale of Two Cities
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  • I entreat you to tell me more, sir.
  • But she sat perfectly still in his grasp, and only said, in a low voice, "I entreat you, good gentlemen, do not come near us, do not speak, do not move!"
  • Which I entreated you to believe, again and again, most fervently, with all my heart, was capable of better things, Mr. Carton!
  • Entreat me to believe it no more, Miss Manette.
  • I entreat you to observe that I have come here voluntarily, in response to that written appeal of a fellow-countryman which lies before you.
  • Charles Darnay felt it hopeless to entreat him further, and his pride was touched besides.
  • "Hush, hush!" the Spy entreats him, timidly.
  • He had returned when he did, on the pressing and written entreaty of a French citizen, who represented that his life was endangered by his absence.
  • "One word," the Doctor entreated.
  • A most earnest, pressing, and emphatic entreaty, addressed to you in the most pathetic tones of the voice so dear to you, that you well remember.
  • This exordium, and Miss Pross’s two hands in quite agonised entreaty clasping his, decided Mr. Cruncher.
  • Be careful of my friend, I entreat you, and leave me.
  • He entreated her, for her father’s sake, never to seek to know whether her father had become oblivious of the existence of the paper, or had had it recalled to him (for the moment, or for good), by the story of the Tower, on that old Sunday under the dear old plane-tree in the garden.
  • In this car of triumph, not even the Doctor’s entreaties could prevent his being carried to his home on men’s shoulders, with a confused sea of red caps heaving about him, and casting up to sight from the stormy deep such wrecks of faces, that he more than once misdoubted his mind being in confusion, and that he was in the tumbril on his way to the Guillotine.
  • …steps of the building; now, on his knees; now, on his feet; now, on his back; dragged, and struck at, and stifled by the bunches of grass and straw that were thrust into his face by hundreds of hands; torn, bruised, panting, bleeding, yet always entreating and beseeching for mercy; now full of vehement agony of action, with a small clear space about him as the people drew one another back that they might see; now, a log of dead wood drawn through a forest of legs; he was hauled to the…

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  • She flattered and entreated him until he agreed to help.
  • She was unmoved by his entreaties.

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