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emigrate
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A Tale of Two Cities
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emigrate
Used In
A Tale of Two Cities
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  • Truly, a decree for selling the property of emigrants.
  • Everybody says it is but one of several, and that there will be others—if there are not already—banishing all emigrants, and condemning all to death who return.
  • "Emigrants have no rights, Evremonde," was the stolid reply.
  • The only response is, that I have acted for an emigrant, and where is that emigrant?
  • The only response is, that I have acted for an emigrant, and where is that emigrant?
  • Ah! most gracious Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, where is that emigrant?
  • "Emigrant," said the functionary, "I am going to send you on to Paris, under an escort."
  • Rise and dress yourself, emigrant.
  • An ominous crowd gathered to see him dismount of the posting-yard, and many voices called out loudly, "Down with the emigrant!"
  • "You are a cursed emigrant," cried a farrier, making at him in a furious manner through the press, hammer in hand; "and you are a cursed aristocrat!"
  • Is this the emigrant Evremonde?
  • It is in vain I represent that, before the sequestration of emigrant property, I had remitted the imposts they had ceased to pay; that I had collected no rent; that I had had recourse to no process.
  • A man with a bloated face opened the strong wicket, to whom Defarge presented "The Emigrant Evremonde."
  • "Come!" said the chief, at length taking up his keys, "come with me, emigrant."
  • Was he not an emigrant then?
  • Not an emigrant, he hoped, within the sense and spirit of the law.
  • The crime for which I am imprisoned, Monsieur heretofore the Marquis, and for which I shall be summoned before the tribunal, and shall lose my life (without your so generous help), is, they tell me, treason against the majesty of the people, in that I have acted against them for an emigrant.
  • Charles Evremonde, called Darnay, was accused by the public prosecutor as an emigrant, whose life was forfeit to the Republic, under the decree which banished all emigrants on pain of Death.
  • Charles Evremonde, called Darnay, was accused by the public prosecutor as an emigrant, whose life was forfeit to the Republic, under the decree which banished all emigrants on pain of Death.
  • One of the first considerations which arose in the business mind of Mr. Lorry when business hours came round, was this:—that he had no right to imperil Tellson’s by sheltering the wife of an emigrant prisoner under the Bank roof.
  • Because he had voluntarily relinquished a title that was distasteful to him, and a station that was distasteful to him, and had left his country—he submitted before the word emigrant in the present acceptation by the Tribunal was in use—to live by his own industry in England, rather than on the industry of the overladen people of France.
  • …Lucie that her husband was no longer confined alone, but was mixed with the general body of prisoners; he saw her husband weekly, and brought sweet messages to her, straight from his lips; sometimes her husband himself sent a letter to her (though never by the Doctor’s hand), but she was not permitted to write to him: for, among the many wild suspicions of plots in the prisons, the wildest of all pointed at emigrants who were known to have made friends or permanent connections abroad.
  • He stopped in the act of swinging himself out of his saddle, and, resuming it as his safest place, said: "Emigrant, my friends!

  • There are no more uses of "emigrate" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • Many people had to emigrate during the Nazi period
  • We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here.
    Thomas Jefferson et al.  --  The Declaration of Independence

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