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A Tale of Two Cities
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A Tale of Two Cities
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  • Madame Defarge was a stout woman of about his own age, with a watchful eye that seldom seemed to look at anything, a large hand heavily ringed, a steady face, strong features, and great composure of manner.
  • At this second interchange of the Christian name, Madame Defarge, still using her toothpick with profound composure, coughed another grain of cough, and raised her eyebrows by the breadth of another line.
  • But, in the composure of his manner he was unaltered, except that to the shrewd glance of Mr. Lorry it disclosed some shadowy indication that the old air of avoidance and dread had lately passed over him, like a cold wind.
  • "Your husband is not my business here," returned Madame Defarge, looking down at her with perfect composure.
  • "You scarcely seem to like your hand," said Sydney, with the greatest composure.
  • "Her husband’s destiny," said Madame Defarge, with her usual composure, "will take him where he is to go, and will lead him to the end that is to end him.

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  • After I regained my composure, I thanked her for telling me about the problem.
  • During all this time he was evidently struggling for composure.
    Austen, Jane  --  Sense and Sensibility

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