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A Tale of Two Cities
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A Tale of Two Cities
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  • Simple as the furniture was, it was set off by so many little adornments, of no value but for their taste and fancy, that its effect was delightful.
  • The time will come, the time will not be long in coming, when new ties will be formed about you—ties that will bind you yet more tenderly and strongly to the home you so adorn—the dearest ties that will ever grace and gladden you.
  • For, the rooms, though a beautiful scene to look at, and adorned with every device of decoration that the taste and skill of the time could achieve, were, in truth, not a sound business; considered with any reference to the scarecrows in the rags and nightcaps elsewhere (and not so far off, either, but that the watching towers of Notre Dame, almost equidistant from the two extremes, could see them both), they would have been an exceedingly uncomfortable business—if that could have beenů

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  • He began dating her on her annual two-week visits home, and although she still moved like a thirteen-year-old boy and abjured most feminine adornment, he found something so intensely feminine about her that he fell in love.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • Wide silver bands that mark me as a slave adorn each wrist.
    Sabaa Tahir  --  An Ember in the Ashes

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