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dispose
used in
Pride and Prejudice
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dispose
Used in
Pride and Prejudice
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  • You are rather disposed to call his interference officious?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But I am at his disposal.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • On the contrary, she was as much disposed to complain of it as her husband.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Impossible! I grieve to find, however, that Colonel F. is not disposed to depend upon their marriage; he shook his head when I expressed my hopes, and said he fear W. was not a man to be trusted.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She has been allowed to dispose of her time in the most idle and frivolous manner, and to adopt any opinions that came in her way.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She felt anew the justice of Mr. Darcy's objections; and never had she been so much disposed to pardon his interference in the views of his friend.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • There is some sense in what he says about the girls, however, and if he is disposed to make them any amends, I shall not be the person to discourage him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mrs. Gardiner looked at her niece, desirous of knowing how she, whom the invitation most concerned, felt disposed as to its acceptance, but Elizabeth had turned away her head.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But in all, and in almost every line of each, there was a want of that cheerfulness which had been used to characterise her style, and which, proceeding from the serenity of a mind at ease with itself and kindly disposed towards everyone, had been scarcely ever clouded.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Very few days passed in which Mr. Collins did not walk to Rosings, and not many in which his wife did not think it necessary to go likewise; and till Elizabeth recollected that there might be other family livings to be disposed of, she could not understand the sacrifice of so many hours.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He had not been long seated before he complimented Mrs. Bennet on having so fine a family of daughters; said he had heard much of their beauty, but that in this instance fame had fallen short of the truth; and added, that he did not doubt her seeing them all in due time disposed of in marriage.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • His sisters were anxious for his having an estate of his own; but, though he was now only established as a tenant, Miss Bingley was by no means unwilling to preside at his table—nor was Mrs. Hurst, who had married a man of more fashion than fortune, less disposed to consider his house as her home when it suited her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassailed by any attention to herself, she was very little disposed to approve them.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • That he was really fond of Jane, she doubted no more than she had ever done; and much as she had always been disposed to like him, she could not think without anger, hardly without contempt, on that easiness of temper, that want of proper resolution, which now made him the slave of his designing friends, and led him to sacrifice of his own happiness to the caprice of their inclination.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Elizabeth soon perceived, that though this great lady was not in commission of the peace of the county, she was a most active magistrate in her own parish, the minutest concerns of which were carried to her by Mr. Collins; and whenever any of the cottagers were disposed to be quarrelsome, discontented, or too poor, she sallied forth into the village to settle their differences, silence their complaints, and scold them into harmony and plenty.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She did not fear her father's opposition, but he was going to be made unhappy; and that it should be through her means—that she, his favourite child, should be distressing him by her choice, should be filling him with fears and regrets in disposing of her—was a wretched reflection, and she sat in misery till Mr. Darcy appeared again, when, looking at him, she was a little relieved by his smile.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • On the very last day of the regiment's remaining at Meryton, he dined, with other of the officers, at Longbourn; and so little was Elizabeth disposed to part from him in good humour, that on his making some inquiry as to the manner in which her time had passed at Hunsford, she mentioned Colonel Fitzwilliam's and Mr. Darcy's having both spent three weeks at Rosings, and asked him, if he was acquainted with the former.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • To interrupt a silence which might make him fancy her affected with what had passed, she soon afterwards said: "I imagine your cousin brought you down with him chiefly for the sake of having someone at his disposal.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He paused in hopes of an answer; but his companion was not disposed to make any; and Elizabeth at that instant moving towards them, he was struck with the action of doing a very gallant thing, and called out to her: "My dear Miss Eliza, why are you not dancing?  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: dispose of the assets
as in: dispose of the waste
as in: dispose of the matter
as in: disposed the troops along...
as in: Is she disposed to help?
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