To better see all uses of the word
Pride and Prejudice
please enable javascript.

Used In
Pride and Prejudice
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Accordingly, when she retired at night, she asked the chambermaid whether Pemberley were not a very fine place? what was the name of its proprietor? and, with no little alarm, whether the family were down for the summer?
  • The rooms were lofty and handsome, and their furniture suitable to the fortune of its proprietor; but Elizabeth saw, with admiration of his taste, that it was neither gaudy nor uselessly fine; with less of splendour, and more real elegance, than the furniture of Rosings.
  • …that he declared he might almost have supposed himself in the small summer breakfast parlour at Rosings; a comparison that did not at first convey much gratification; but when Mrs. Phillips understood from him what Rosings was, and who was its proprietor—when she had listened to the description of only one of Lady Catherine’s drawing-rooms, and found that the chimney-piece alone had cost eight hundred pounds, she felt all the force of the compliment, and would hardly have resented a…

  • There are no more uses of "proprietor" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • After 40 years of greeting guests in person, the proprietor is retiring.
  • No tax can be laid on land which will not affect the proprietor of millions of acres as well as the proprietor of a single acre.
    Alexander Hamilton  --  The Federalist Papers

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading