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used in
Pride and Prejudice
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Used in
Pride and Prejudice
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  • On both sides it was only assertion.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • To Caroline's assertion of her brother's being partial to Miss Darcy she paid no credit.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I do not mean, however, to assert that we can be justified in devoting too much of our time to music, for there are certainly other things to be attended to.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But, my dear sister, though the event has proved you right, do not think me obstinate if I still assert that, considering what her behaviour was, my confidence was as natural as your suspicion.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But I shall not scruple to assert, that the serenity of your sister's countenance and air was such as might have given the most acute observer a conviction that, however amiable her temper, her heart was not likely to be easily touched.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • A man of honour could not have doubted the intention, but Mr. Darcy chose to doubt it—or to treat it as a merely conditional recommendation, and to assert that I had forfeited all claim to it by extravagance, imprudence—in short anything or nothing.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • You may well be surprised, Miss Bennet, at such an assertion, after seeing, as you probably might, the very cold manner of our meeting yesterday.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Every lingering struggle in his favour grew fainter and fainter; and in farther justification of Mr. Darcy, she could not but allow Mr. Bingley, when questioned by Jane, had long ago asserted his blamelessness in the affair; that proud and repulsive as were his manners, she had never, in the whole course of their acquaintance—an acquaintance which had latterly brought them much together, and given her a sort of intimacy with his ways—seen anything that betrayed him to be unprincipled…  (not reviewed by editor)

  • After joining in general lamentations over the dreadful sequel of this event, which Elizabeth considered as all but certain, and Miss Bennet could not assert to be wholly impossible, the former continued the subject, by saying, "But tell me all and everything about it which I have not already heard.  (not reviewed by editor)

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as in: asserted her authority
as in: asserted her opinion that...
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