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Pride and Prejudice
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Pride and Prejudice
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  • "I might as well inquire," replied she, "why with so evident a desire of offending and insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your character?"
  • So he inquired who she was, and got introduced, and asked her for the two next.
  • The officer was the very Mr. Denny concerning whose return from London Lydia came to inquire, and he bowed as they passed.
  • He was then, he said, on his way to Longbourn on purpose to inquire after her.
  • He inquired how far Netherfield was from Meryton; and, after receiving her answer, asked in a hesitating manner how long Mr. Darcy had been staying there.
  • After breakfast, the girls walked to Meryton to inquire if Mr. Wickham were returned, and to lament over his absence from the Netherfield ball.
  • As to his real character, had information been in her power, she had never felt a wish of inquiring.
  • I inquired after their brother, of course.
  • At length, however, his civility was so far awakened as to inquire of Elizabeth after the health of her family.
  • There is no talk of his coming to Netherfield again in the summer; and I have inquired of everybody, too, who is likely to know.
  • He inquired in a friendly, though general way, after her family, and looked and spoke with the same good-humoured ease that he had ever done.
  • She longed to inquire of the housekeeper whether her master was really absent, but had not the courage for it.
  • —but to speak with such civility, to inquire after her family!
  • She retreated from the window, fearful of being seen; and as she walked up and down the room, endeavouring to compose herself, saw such looks of inquiring surprise in her uncle and aunt as made everything worse.
  • Darcy, after inquiring of her how Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner did, a question which she could not answer without confusion, said scarcely anything.
  • She inquired after his sister, but could do no more.
  • She then proceeded to inquire into the measures which her father had intended to pursue, while in town, for the recovery of his daughter.
  • She inquired into Charlotte’s domestic concerns familiarly and minutely, gave her a great deal of advice as to the management of them all; told her how everything ought to be regulated in so small a family as hers, and instructed her as to the care of her cows and her poultry.
  • While settling this point, she was suddenly roused by the sound of the door-bell, and her spirits were a little fluttered by the idea of its being Colonel Fitzwilliam himself, who had once before called late in the evening, and might now come to inquire particularly after her.
  • The bride and her mother could neither of them talk fast enough; and Wickham, who happened to sit near Elizabeth, began inquiring after his acquaintance in that neighbourhood, with a good humoured ease which she felt very unable to equal in her replies.
  • The very last evening was spent there; and her ladyship again inquired minutely into the particulars of their journey, gave them directions as to the best method of packing, and was so urgent on the necessity of placing gowns in the only right way, that Maria thought herself obliged, on her return, to undo all the work of the morning, and pack her trunk afresh.
  • Their party in the dining-room was large, for almost all the Lucases came to meet Maria and hear the news; and various were the subjects that occupied them: Lady Lucas was inquiring of Maria, after the welfare and poultry of her eldest daughter; Mrs. Bennet was doubly engaged, on one hand collecting an account of the present fashions from Jane, who sat some way below her, and, on the other, retailing them all to the younger Lucases; and Lydia, in a voice rather louder than any other…
  • …wife received a letter from him; it told them that, on his arrival, he had immediately found out his brother, and persuaded him to come to Gracechurch Street; that Mr. Bennet had been to Epsom and Clapham, before his arrival, but without gaining any satisfactory information; and that he was now determined to inquire at all the principal hotels in town, as Mr. Bennet thought it possible they might have gone to one of them, on their first coming to London, before they procured lodgings.

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  • Students should contact our office to inquire about scholarship opportunities.
  • I am here to inquire about the job.

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