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Pride and Prejudice
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Pride and Prejudice
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  • The expression of his face changed gradually from indignant contempt to a composed and steady gravity.
  • Elizabeth, to whom Jane very soon communicated the chief of all this, heard it in silent indignation.
  • Elizabeth made no answer, and walked on, her heart swelling with indignation.
  • She paused, and saw with no slight indignation that he was listening with an air which proved him wholly unmoved by any feeling of remorse.
  • Had Lydia and her mother known the substance of her conference with her father, their indignation would hardly have found expression in their united volubility.
  • Elizabeth could not see Lady Catherine without recollecting that, had she chosen it, she might by this time have been presented to her as her future niece; nor could she think, without a smile, of what her ladyship’s indignation would have been.
  • When she remembered the style of his address, she was still full of indignation; but when she considered how unjustly she had condemned and upbraided him, her anger was turned against herself; and his disappointed feelings became the object of compassion.
  • Lady Catherine was extremely indignant on the marriage of her nephew; and as she gave way to all the genuine frankness of her character in her reply to the letter which announced its arrangement, she sent him language so very abusive, especially of Elizabeth, that for some time all intercourse was at an end.
  • Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much engrossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbour, till Sir William thus began: "What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy!
  • And with regard to the resentment of his family, or the indignation of the world, if the former were excited by his marrying me, it would not give me one moment’s concern—and the world in general would have too much sense to join in the scorn."

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  • She was indignant, but agreed to be searched when they accused her of shoplifting.
  • "I am not a fool," she said indignantly.

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