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indifferent
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Pride and Prejudice
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indifferent
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Pride and Prejudice
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  • She answered with equal indifference and brevity, and the others said no more.
  • He listened to her with perfect indifference while she chose to entertain herself in this manner; and as his composure convinced her that all was safe, her wit flowed long.
  • It seems to me to show an abominable sort of conceited independence, a most country-town indifference to decorum.
  • Her indifferent state of health unhappily prevents her being in town; and by that means, as I told Lady Catherine one day, has deprived the British court of its brightest ornaments.
  • She hated having visitors in the house while her health was so indifferent, and lovers were of all people the most disagreeable.
  • Even Elizabeth began to fear—not that Bingley was indifferent—but that his sisters would be successful in keeping him away.
  • To the girls, who could not listen to their cousin, and who had nothing to do but to wish for an instrument, and examine their own indifferent imitations of china on the mantelpiece, the interval of waiting appeared very long.
  • Catherine was disconcerted, and made no answer; but Lydia, with perfect indifference, continued to express her admiration of Captain Carter, and her hope of seeing him in the course of the day, as he was going the next morning to London.
  • He assured her, that as to dancing, he was perfectly indifferent to it; that his chief object was by delicate attentions to recommend himself to her and that he should therefore make a point of remaining close to her the whole evening.
  • With an air of indifference he soon afterwards added: "How long did you say he was at Rosings?"
  • I did not believe her to be indifferent because I wished it; I believed it on impartial conviction, as truly as I wished it in reason.
  • I know you will do him such ample justice, that I am growing every moment more unconcerned and indifferent.
  • That I was desirous of believing her indifferent is certain—but I will venture to say that my investigation and decisions are not usually influenced by my hopes or fears.
  • To fortune I am perfectly indifferent, and shall make no demand of that nature on your father, since I am well aware that it could not be complied with; and that one thousand pounds in the four per cents, which will not be yours till after your mother’s decease, is all that you may ever be entitled to.
  • The sisters, on hearing this, repeated three or four times how much they were grieved, how shocking it was to have a bad cold, and how excessively they disliked being ill themselves; and then thought no more of the matter: and their indifference towards Jane when not immediately before them restored Elizabeth to the enjoyment of all her former dislike.
  • This was spoken jestingly; but it appeared to her so just a picture of Mr. Darcy, that she would not trust herself with an answer, and therefore, abruptly changing the conversation talked on indifferent matters until they reached the Parsonage.
  • It would be nothing; I could see him with perfect indifference, but I can hardly bear to hear it thus perpetually talked of.
  • Forgive me; and if you persist in indifference, do not make me your confidante.
  • After this day, Jane said no more of her indifference.
  • "Have you any other objection," said Elizabeth, "than your belief of my indifference?"
  • "Why, if he came only to be silent, grave, and indifferent," said she, "did he come at all?"
  • It will then be publicly seen that, on both sides, we meet only as common and indifferent acquaintance.
  • "Yes, very indifferent indeed," said Elizabeth, laughingly.
  • But, however this remonstrance might have staggered or delayed his determination, I do not suppose that it would ultimately have prevented the marriage, had it not been seconded by the assurance that I hesitated not in giving, of your sister’s indifference.
  • Had they fixed on any other man it would have been nothing; but his perfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd!
  • Had not my feelings decided against you—had they been indifferent, or had they even been favourable, do you think that any consideration would tempt me to accept the man who has been the means of ruining, perhaps for ever, the happiness of a most beloved sister?
  • Would you believe it, Lizzy, that when he went to town last November, he really loved me, and nothing but a persuasion of my being indifferent would have prevented his coming down again!
  • His affection for her soon sunk into indifference; her’s lasted a little longer; and in spite of her youth and her manners, she retained all the claims to reputation which her marriage had given her.
  • He bore it with noble indifference, and she would have imagined that Bingley had received his sanction to be happy, had she not seen his eyes likewise turned towards Mr. Darcy, with an expression of half-laughing alarm.
  • I told him, moreover, that I believed myself mistaken in supposing, as I had done, that your sister was indifferent to him; and as I could easily perceive that his attachment to her was unabated, I felt no doubt of their happiness together.
  • Her father had most cruelly mortified her, by what he said of Mr. Darcy’s indifference, and she could do nothing but wonder at such a want of penetration, or fear that perhaps, instead of his seeing too little, she might have fancied too much.
  • A most welcome negative followed the last question—and her alarms now being removed, she was at leisure to feel a great deal of curiosity to see the house herself; and when the subject was revived the next morning, and she was again applied to, could readily answer, and with a proper air of indifference, that she had not really any dislike to the scheme.
  • Does it not expressly declare that Caroline neither expects nor wishes me to be her sister; that she is perfectly convinced of her brother’s indifference; and that if she suspects the nature of my feelings for him, she means (most kindly!

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  • About a third are in favor of the change, a third are opposed, and a third are indifferent.
  • Before meeting us, she felt alone in an indifferent world.

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