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Pride and Prejudice
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impertinent -- as in: she was impertinent
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Pride and Prejudice
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  • Her manners were pronounced to be very bad indeed, a mixture of pride and impertinence; she had no conversation, no style, no beauty.
  • He has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him.
  • And, if I may mention so delicate a subject, endeavour to check that little something, bordering on conceit and impertinence, which your lady possesses.
  • No, that I am sure I shall not; and I think it is very impertinent of him to write to you at all, and very hypocritical.
  • Elizabeth felt all the impertinence of her questions but answered them very composedly.
  • Nothing less than the complaisance of a courtier could have borne without anger such treatment; but Sir William’s good breeding carried him through it all; and though he begged leave to be positive as to the truth of his information, he listened to all their impertinence with the most forbearing courtesy.
  • Lady Catherine seemed quite astonished at not receiving a direct answer; and Elizabeth suspected herself to be the first creature who had ever dared to trifle with so much dignified impertinence.
  • If you do not choose to understand me, forgive my impertinence.
  • Now be sincere; did you admire me for my impertinence?
  • You may as well call it impertinence at once.
  • I told him of all that had occurred to make my former interference in his affairs absurd and impertinent.
  • Elizabeth tried hard to dissuade him from such a scheme, assuring him that Mr. Darcy would consider his addressing him without introduction as an impertinent freedom, rather than a compliment to his aunt; that it was not in the least necessary there should be any notice on either side; and that if it were, it must belong to Mr. Darcy, the superior in consequence, to begin the acquaintance.
  • As she had heard no carriage, she thought it not unlikely to be Lady Catherine, and under that apprehension was putting away her half-finished letter that she might escape all impertinent questions, when the door opened, and, to her very great surprise, Mr. Darcy, and Mr. Darcy only, entered the room.
  • …whenever they met, that he did admire her and to her it was equally evident that Jane was yielding to the preference which she had begun to entertain for him from the first, and was in a way to be very much in love; but she considered with pleasure that it was not likely to be discovered by the world in general, since Jane united, with great strength of feeling, a composure of temper and a uniform cheerfulness of manner which would guard her from the suspicions of the impertinent.

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  • It was impertinent of the child to lecture a grownup.
  • He deemed all such inquiries on the part of a slave improper and impertinent, and evidence of a restless spirit.
    Douglass, Frederick  --  Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass An American Slave

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