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Pride and Prejudice
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Pride and Prejudice
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  • If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least.
  • Mr. Phillips visited them all, and this opened to his nieces a store of felicity unknown before.
  • Till the next morning, however, she was not aware of all the felicity of her contrivance.
  • Have you anything else to propose for my domestic felicity?
  • If therefore she actually persists in rejecting my suit, perhaps it were better not to force her into accepting me, because if liable to such defects of temper, she could not contribute much to my felicity.
  • She saw her in idea settled in that very house, in all the felicity which a marriage of true affection could bestow; and she felt capable, under such circumstances, of endeavouring even to like Bingley’s two sisters.
  • Only let me assure you, my dear Miss Elizabeth, that I can from my heart most cordially wish you equal felicity in marriage.
  • Chapter 25 After a week spent in professions of love and schemes of felicity, Mr. Collins was called from his amiable Charlotte by the arrival of Saturday.
  • Chapter 42 Had Elizabeth’s opinion been all drawn from her own family, she could not have formed a very pleasing opinion of conjugal felicity or domestic comfort.
  • In vain did Elizabeth endeavour to check the rapidity of her mother’s words, or persuade her to describe her felicity in a less audible whisper; for, to her inexpressible vexation, she could perceive that the chief of it was overheard by Mr. Darcy, who sat opposite to them.
  • He wisely resolved to be particularly careful that no sign of admiration should now escape him, nothing that could elevate her with the hope of influencing his felicity; sensible that if such an idea had been suggested, his behaviour during the last day must have material weight in confirming or crushing it.
  • She was disturbed by no fear for her felicity, nor humbled by any remembrance of her misconduct.
  • But no such happy marriage could now teach the admiring multitude what connubial felicity really was.
  • It was consequently necessary to name some other period for the commencement of actual felicity—to have some other point on which her wishes and hopes might be fixed, and by again enjoying the pleasure of anticipation, console herself for the present, and prepare for another disappointment.
  • Mrs. Bennet was diffuse in her good wishes for the felicity of her daughter, and impressive in her injunctions that she should not miss the opportunity of enjoying herself as much as possible—advice which there was every reason to believe would be well attended to; and in the clamorous happiness of Lydia herself in bidding farewell, the more gentle adieus of her sisters were uttered without being heard.
  • I wish I could say, for the sake of her family, that the accomplishment of her earnest desire in the establishment of so many of her children produced so happy an effect as to make her a sensible, amiable, well-informed woman for the rest of her life; though perhaps it was lucky for her husband, who might not have relished domestic felicity in so unusual a form, that she still was occasionally nervous and invariably silly.
  • They shook hands with great cordiality; and then, till her sister came down, she had to listen to all he had to say of his own happiness, and of Jane’s perfections; and in spite of his being a lover, Elizabeth really believed all his expectations of felicity to be rationally founded, because they had for basis the excellent understanding, and super-excellent disposition of Jane, and a general similarity of feeling and taste between her and himself.
  • "Oh, my dear, dear aunt," she rapturously cried, "what delight! what felicity!

  • There are no more uses of "felicity" in the book.

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  • A mind always employed is always happy. This is the true secret, the grand recipe, for felicity.
    Thomas Jefferson
  • There is a time when a man distinguishes the idea of felicity from the idea of wealth; it is the beginning of wisdom.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

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