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Pride and Prejudice
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Pride and Prejudice
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  • She had been graciously pleased to approve of both of the discourses which he had already had the honour of preaching before her.
  • She then changed the discourse to one more gratifying to each, and on which there could be no difference of sentiment.
  • You can hardly doubt the purport of my discourse, however your natural delicacy may lead you to dissemble; my attentions have been too marked to be mistaken.
  • Here consequently was an inexhaustible subject of discourse.
  • There was no want of discourse.
  • In the intervals of her discourse with Mrs. Collins, she addressed a variety of questions to Maria and Elizabeth, but especially to the latter, of whose connections she knew the least, and who she observed to Mrs. Collins was a very genteel, pretty kind of girl.
  • She was not near enough to hear any of their discourse, but she could see how seldom they spoke to each other, and how formal and cold was their manner whenever they did.
  • It was first broken by Mrs. Annesley, a genteel, agreeable-looking woman, whose endeavour to introduce some kind of discourse proved her to be more truly well-bred than either of the others; and between her and Mrs. Gardiner, with occasional help from Elizabeth, the conversation was carried on.

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  • The event has elevated the level of public discourse on this issue.
  • The idea of individual rights is prominent in American discourse.

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