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countenance
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Pride and Prejudice
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countenance
Used In
Pride and Prejudice
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as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
  • ...affording her their personal protection and countenance, is such a sacrifice to her advantage...

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  • We will not countenance torture.
  • They countenance and support terrorism.

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as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
  • Elizabeth admired the command of countenance with which...

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  • She has a pleasant countenance.
  • Her countenance grew stern.

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unspecified meaning
  • Mr. Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy, unaffected manners.
  • I could hardly keep my countenance.

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  • Such a countenance, such manners!
  • Nothing but concern for Elizabeth could enable Bingley to keep his countenance.
  • His appearance was greatly in his favour; he had all the best part of beauty, a fine countenance, a good figure, and very pleasing address.
  • Lydia was a stout, well-grown girl of fifteen, with a fine complexion and good-humoured countenance; a favourite with her mother, whose affection had brought her into public at an early age.
  • The envelope contained a sheet of elegant, little, hot-pressed paper, well covered with a lady’s fair, flowing hand; and Elizabeth saw her sister’s countenance change as she read it, and saw her dwelling intently on some particular passages.
  • He spoke of apprehension and anxiety, but his countenance expressed real security.
  • His countenance, voice, and manner had established him at once in the possession of every virtue.
  • Poor Wickham! there is such an expression of goodness in his countenance! such an openness and gentleness in his manner!

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  • And there is something of dignity in his countenance that would not give one an unfavourable idea of his heart.
  • His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened to him with the keenest enjoyment, maintaining at the same time the most resolute composure of countenance, and, except in an occasional glance at Elizabeth, requiring no partner in his pleasure.
  • She could have added, "A young man, too, like you, whose very countenance may vouch for your being amiable"—but she contented herself with, "and one, too, who had probably been his companion from childhood, connected together, as I think you said, in the closest manner!"
  • Mr. Darcy corroborated it with a bow, and was beginning to determine not to fix his eyes on Elizabeth, when they were suddenly arrested by the sight of the stranger, and Elizabeth happening to see the countenance of both as they looked at each other, was all astonishment at the effect of the meeting.
  • But I shall not scruple to assert, that the serenity of your sister’s countenance and air was such as might have given the most acute observer a conviction that, however amiable her temper, her heart was not likely to be easily touched.
  • The officers of the ——shire were in general a very creditable, gentlemanlike set, and the best of them were of the present party; but Mr. Wickham was as far beyond them all in person, countenance, air, and walk, as they were superior to the broad-faced, stuffy uncle Phillips, breathing port wine, who followed them into the room.
  • When, after examining the mother, in whose countenance and deportment she soon found some resemblance of Mr. Darcy, she turned her eyes on the daughter, she could almost have joined in Maria’s astonishment at her being so thin and so small.
  • His countenance rather gained in austerity; and he scarcely opened his lips.
  • The turn of your countenance I shall never forget, as you said that I could not have addressed you in any possible way that would induce you to accept me.
  • Lady Catherine listened to half a song, and then talked, as before, to her other nephew; till the latter walked away from her, and making with his usual deliberation towards the pianoforte stationed himself so as to command a full view of the fair performer’s countenance.
  • There was a something in her countenance which made him listen with an apprehensive and anxious attention, while she added: "When I said that he improved on acquaintance, I did not mean that his mind or his manners were in a state of improvement, but that, from knowing him better, his disposition was better understood."
  • …to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud; to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared with his friend.
  • His ease and cheerfulness rendered him a most agreeable addition to their evening party; and he bore with the ill-judged officiousness of the mother, and heard all her silly remarks with a forbearance and command of countenance particularly grateful to the daughter.
  • In no countenance was attentive curiosity so strongly marked as in Miss Bingley’s, in spite of the smiles which overspread her face whenever she spoke to one of its objects; for jealousy had not yet made her desperate, and her attentions to Mr. Darcy were by no means over.
  • "I want to know," said she, with a countenance no less smiling than her sister’s, "what you have learnt about Mr. Wickham.
  • "To be sure, Lizzy," said her aunt, "he is not so handsome as Wickham; or, rather, he has not Wickham’s countenance, for his features are perfectly good.
  • The steady countenance which Miss Lucas had commanded in telling her story, gave way to a momentary confusion here on receiving so direct a reproach; though, as it was no more than she expected, she soon regained her composure, and calmly replied: "Why should you be surprised, my dear Eliza?
  • As for Mary, she was mistress enough of herself to whisper to Elizabeth, with a countenance of grave reflection, soon after they were seated at table: "This is a most unfortunate affair, and will probably be much talked of.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
Show Multiple Meanings
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