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cordial
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Pride and Prejudice
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cordial -- as in: a cordial reception
Used In
Pride and Prejudice
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  • They were not welcomed home very cordially by their mother.
  • Mr. Darcy walked off; and Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feelings toward him.
  • But my feelings are not only cordial towards him; they are even impartial towards Miss King.
  • Only let me assure you, my dear Miss Elizabeth, that I can from my heart most cordially wish you equal felicity in marriage.
  • All Elizabeth’s anger against him had been long done away; but had she still felt any, it could hardly have stood its ground against the unaffected cordiality with which he expressed himself on seeing her again.
  • As he was to begin his journey too early on the morrow to see any of the family, the ceremony of leave-taking was performed when the ladies moved for the night; and Mrs. Bennet, with great politeness and cordiality, said how happy they should be to see him at Longbourn again, whenever his engagements might allow him to visit them.
  • Their reception from Mr. Bennet, to whom they then turned, was not quite so cordial.
  • Elizabeth looked at Darcy to see how cordially he assented to his cousin’s praise; but neither at that moment nor at any other could she discern any symptom of love; and from the whole of his behaviour to Miss de Bourgh she derived this comfort for Miss Bingley, that he might have been just as likely to marry her, had she been his relation.
  • As he quitted the room, Elizabeth felt how improbable it was that they should ever see each other again on such terms of cordiality as had marked their several meetings in Derbyshire; and as she threw a retrospective glance over the whole of their acquaintance, so full of contradictions and varieties, sighed at the perverseness of those feelings which would now have promoted its continuance, and would formerly have rejoiced in its termination.
  • They shook hands with great cordiality; and then, till her sister came down, she had to listen to all he had to say of his own happiness, and of Jane’s perfections; and in spite of his being a lover, Elizabeth really believed all his expectations of felicity to be rationally founded, because they had for basis the excellent understanding, and super-excellent disposition of Jane, and a general similarity of feeling and taste between her and himself.

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  • The countries share a long border and have cordial relations.
  • We had a cordial exchange of ideas.

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