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Pride and Prejudice
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Pride and Prejudice
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  • It was a painful, but not an improbable, conjecture.
  • The rest of the evening was spent in conjecturing how soon he would return Mr. Bennet’s visit, and determining when they should ask him to dinner.
  • You conjecture is totally wrong, I assure you.
  • It is, in short, impossible for us to conjecture the causes or circumstances which may have alienated them, without actual blame on either side.
  • It was all conjecture.
  • They were off Saturday night about twelve, as is conjectured, but were not missed till yesterday morning at eight.
  • Conjectures as to the meaning of it, rapid and wild, hurried into her brain; but she was satisfied with none.
  • He meant to resign his commission immediately; and as to his future situation, he could conjecture very little about it.
  • They both set off, and the conjectures of the remaining three continued, though with little satisfaction, till the door was thrown open and their visitor entered.
  • But when Elizabeth told of his silence; it did not seem very likely, even to Charlotte’s wishes, to be the case; and after various conjectures, they could at last only suppose his visit to proceed from the difficulty of finding anything to do, which was the more probable from the time of year.
  • As they walked across the hall towards the river, Elizabeth turned back to look again; her uncle and aunt stopped also, and while the former was conjecturing as to the date of the building, the owner of it himself suddenly came forward from the road, which led behind it to the stables.
  • He was anxious to avoid the notice of his cousins, from a conviction that if they saw him depart, they could not fail to conjecture his design, and he was not willing to have the attempt known till its success might be known likewise; for though feeling almost secure, and with reason, for Charlotte had been tolerably encouraging, he was comparatively diffident since the adventure of Wednesday.
  • But how little of permanent happiness could belong to a couple who were only brought together because their passions were stronger than their virtue, she could easily conjecture.
  • It may be easily believed, that however little of novelty could be added to their fears, hopes, and conjectures, on this interesting subject, by its repeated discussion, no other could detain them from it long, during the whole of the journey.
  • The present unhappy state of the family rendered any other excuse for the lowness of her spirits unnecessary; nothing, therefore, could be fairly conjectured from that, though Elizabeth, who was by this time tolerably well acquainted with her own feelings, was perfectly aware that, had she known nothing of Darcy, she could have borne the dread of Lydia’s infamy somewhat better.

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  • She dismissed it as mere conjecture.
  • It is important to distinguish between conjecture and fact.

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