To better see all uses of the word
Pride and Prejudice
please enable javascript.

Used In
Pride and Prejudice
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • You will be censured, slighted, and despised, by everyone connected with him.
  • I would not wish to be hasty in censuring anyone; but I always speak what I think.
  • "I deserve neither such praise nor such censure," cried Elizabeth; "I am not a great reader, and I have pleasure in many things."
  • Oh! my dear father, can you suppose it possible that they will not be censured and despised wherever they are known, and that their sisters will not be often involved in the disgrace?
  • Mrs. Bennet and her daughters then departed, and Elizabeth returned instantly to Jane, leaving her own and her relations’ behaviour to the remarks of the two ladies and Mr. Darcy; the latter of whom, however, could not be prevailed on to join in their censure of her, in spite of all Miss Bingley’s witticisms on fine eyes.
  • You dare not, you cannot deny, that you have been the principal, if not the only means of dividing them from each other—of exposing one to the censure of the world for caprice and instability, and the other to its derision for disappointed hopes, and involving them both in misery of the acutest kind.
  • But amidst your concern for the defects of your nearest relations, and your displeasure at this representation of them, let it give you consolation to consider that, to have conducted yourselves so as to avoid any share of the like censure, is praise no less generally bestowed on you and your elder sister, than it is honourable to the sense and disposition of both.
  • Never, even in the company of his dear friends at Netherfield, or his dignified relations at Rosings, had she seen him so desirous to please, so free from self-consequence or unbending reserve, as now, when no importance could result from the success of his endeavours, and when even the acquaintance of those to whom his attentions were addressed would draw down the ridicule and censure of the ladies both of Netherfield and Rosings.

  • There are no more uses of "censure" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • They censured him for bringing dishonor upon the Senate.
  • In spite of the censure of her colleagues, she believed she had done the right thing.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading