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Pride and Prejudice
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Pride and Prejudice
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  • I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow.
  • Sir William and Lady Lucas were speedily applied to for their consent; and it was bestowed with a most joyful alacrity.
  • He answered me with the utmost civility, and even paid me the compliment of saying that he was so well convinced of Lady Catherine’s discernment as to be certain she could never bestow a favour unworthily.
  • She saw her in idea settled in that very house, in all the felicity which a marriage of true affection could bestow; and she felt capable, under such circumstances, of endeavouring even to like Bingley’s two sisters.
  • I believe she did—and I am sure she could not have bestowed her kindness on a more grateful object.
  • She highly approved his forbearance, and they had leisure for a full discussion of it, and for all the commendation which they civilly bestowed on each other, as Wickham and another officer walked back with them to Longbourn, and during the walk he particularly attended to her.
  • But I cannot—I have never desired your good opinion, and you have certainly bestowed it most unwillingly.
  • You must, therefore, pardon the freedom with which I demand your attention; your feelings, I know, will bestow it unwillingly, but I demand it of your justice.
  • The commendation bestowed on him by Mrs. Reynolds was of no trifling nature.
  • —how much of pleasure or pain was it in his power to bestow!
  • In comparing her recollection of Pemberley with the minute description which Wickham could give, and in bestowing her tribute of praise on the character of its late possessor, she was delighting both him and herself.
  • But from the severity of that blame which was last night so liberally bestowed, respecting each circumstance, I shall hope to be in the future secured, when the following account of my actions and their motives has been read.
  • Supposing him to be attached to me, would my refusing to accept his hand make him wish to bestow it on his cousin?
  • Wickham is the son of a very respectable man, who had for many years the management of all the Pemberley estates, and whose good conduct in the discharge of his trust naturally inclined my father to be of service to him; and on George Wickham, who was his godson, his kindness was therefore liberally bestowed.
  • Elizabeth had now but little time for conversation with her sister; for while he was present, Jane had no attention to bestow on anyone else; but she found herself considerably useful to both of them in those hours of separation that must sometimes occur.
  • But amidst your concern for the defects of your nearest relations, and your displeasure at this representation of them, let it give you consolation to consider that, to have conducted yourselves so as to avoid any share of the like censure, is praise no less generally bestowed on you and your elder sister, than it is honourable to the sense and disposition of both.

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  • bestow blessings upon the marriage
  • In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed; it must be achieved.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt

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