To better see all uses of the word
To Kill a Mockingbird
please enable javascript.

Used In
To Kill a Mockingbird
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • The defendant is not guilty, but somebody in this courtroom is.
  • After many telephone calls, much pleading on behalf of the defendant, and a long forgiving letter from his mother, it was decided that Dill could stay.
  • A question from Judge Taylor made him relax: "Mr. Ewell, did you see the defendant having sexual intercourse with your daughter?"
  • The spectators were quiet, but the defendant said something.
  • What did you do when you saw the defendant?
  • Miss Mayella, not to be tedious, you’ve testified that the defendant hit you, grabbed you around the neck, choked you, and took advantage of you.
  • Atticus turned to the defendant.
  • "Now," said Atticus, "Miss Mayella, you’ve testified that the defendant choked and beat you—"
  • Her father saw it, and the defendant has testified as to his remarks.
  • A jury never looks at a defendant it has convicted, and when this jury came in, not one of them looked at Tom Robinson.
  • The law says ’reasonable doubt,’ but I think a defendant’s entitled to the shadow of a doubt.
  • I am confident that you gentlemen will review without passion the evidence you have heard, come to a decision, and restore this defendant to his family.
  • It has relied instead upon the testimony of two witnesses whose evidence has not only been called into serious question on cross-examination, but has been flatly contradicted by the defendant.
  • We were surprised to find that we had been gone nearly an hour, and were equally surprised to find the courtroom exactly as we had left it, with minor changes: the jury box was empty, the defendant was gone; Judge Taylor had been gone, but he reappeared as we were seating ourselves.
  • "Gentlemen," he was saying, "I shall be brief, but I would like to use my remaining time with you to remind you that this case is not a difficult one, it requires no minute sifting of complicated facts, but it does require you to be sure beyond all reasonable doubt as to the guilt of the defendant."

  • There are no more uses of "defendant" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • The defendant is confident she will be found innocent.
  • The jury did not know about the defendant had a long criminal history.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading