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delirium
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Wuthering Heights
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delirium
Used In
Wuthering Heights
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unspecified meaning
  • It proved the commencement of delirium: Mr. Kenneth, as soon as he saw her, pronounced her dangerously ill; she had a fever.
  • But I soon found her delirious strength much surpassed mine (she was delirious, I became convinced by her subsequent actions and ravings).

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  • But I soon found her delirious strength much surpassed mine (she was delirious, I became convinced by her subsequent actions and ravings).
  • The delirium was not fixed, however; having weaned her eyes from contemplating the outer darkness, by degrees she centred her attention on him, and discovered who it was that held her.
  • Heathcliff, aware that his opponent was ignorant of the treatment received while insensible, called him deliriously intoxicated; and said he should not notice his atrocious conduct further, but advised him to get to bed.

  • There are no more uses of "delirium" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: fever induced delirium Define
a usually brief state of mental confusion often accompanied by hallucinations
as in: delirious with joy Define
a state of having been taken over by excitement or emotion
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