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despise
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Great Expectations
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despise
Used In
Great Expectations
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  • She threw the cards down on the table when she had won them all, as if she despised them for having been won of me.
  • I was haunted by the fear that she would, sooner or later, find me out, with a black face and hands, doing the coarsest part of my work, and would exult over me and despise me.
  • Here is a chicken had round from the Boar, here is a tongue had round from the Boar, here’s one or two little things had round from the Boar, that I hope you may not despise.
  • I began to consider whether I was not more naturally and wholesomely situated, after all, in these circumstances, than playing beggar my neighbor by candle-light in the room with the stopped clocks, and being despised by Estella.
  • So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.
  • —As I really think I should have liked to do myself, if I had been in their place and so despised.
  • It makes me wretched that you should encourage a man so generally despised as Drummle.
  • You know he is despised.
  • He held on, in a dull persistent way, and Estella held him on; now with encouragement, now with discouragement, now almost flattering him, now openly despising him, now knowing him very well, now scarcely remembering who he was.
  • And so quick were my thoughts, that I saw myself despised by unborn generations,— Estella’s children, and their children,—while the wretch’s words were yet on his lips.
  • So, leaving word with the shopman on what day I was wanted at Miss Havisham’s again, I set off on the four-mile walk to our forge; pondering, as I went along, on all I had seen, and deeply revolving that I was a common laboring-boy; that my hands were coarse; that my boots were thick; that I had fallen into a despicable habit of calling knaves Jacks; that I was much more ignorant than I had considered myself last night, and generally that I was in a low-lived bad way.
  • Drummle laughed outright, and sat laughing in our faces, with his hands in his pockets and his round shoulders raised; plainly signifying that it was quite true, and that he despised us as asses all.

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  • She despises the people he has to work for.
  • They despise each other.

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