To better see all uses of the word
incline
in
Great Expectations
please enable javascript.

incline
Used In
Great Expectations
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

as in: on an incline or incline his head Define
to be at an angle or to bend
  • As for example; on the question whether ’twas nobler in the mind to suffer, some roared yes, and some no, and some inclining to both opinions said "Toss up for it;" and quite a Debating Society arose.

  • There are no more uses of "incline" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

    Show samples from other sources
  • I climbed down the incline.
  • She inclined her head to indicate her agreement.

  • Go to more samples

as in: I'm inclined to Define
a tendency; in the mood; or an attitude that favors something
  • There Joe ... informed me ... that I was to take a little nourishment at stated frequent times, whether I felt inclined for it or not, and that I was to submit myself to all his orders.
  • Now, your inclinations are to be consulted.

  • Show more
  • No. Apart from any inclinations of my own, I understood Wemmick’s hint now.
  • I done what I could to keep you and Tickler in sunders, but my power were not always fully equal to my inclinations.
  • "Not necessary," said I. "—Had made some little stir in a certain part of the world where a good many people go, not always in gratification of their own inclinations, and not quite irrespective of the government expense—"
  • If he’s always right (which in general he’s more likely wrong), he’s right when he says this: Supposing ever you kep any little matter to yourself, when you was a little child, you kep it mostly because you know’d as J. Gargery’s power to part you and Tickler in sunders were not fully equal to his inclinations.

  • There are no more uses of "inclined" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

    Show samples from other sources
  • I’m inclined to believe him.
  • I was inclined to laugh, but overcame the urge.

  • Go to more samples

unspecified meaning
  • Without evincing any inclination to come in again, he there delivered his valedictory remarks.
  • I was afraid to sleep, even if I had been inclined, for I knew that at the first faint dawn of morning I must rob the pantry.

  • Show more
  • At breakfast-time my sister declared her intention of going to town with us, and being left at Uncle Pumblechook’s and called for "when we had done with our fine ladies"—a way of putting the case, from which Joe appeared inclined to augur the worst.
  • Now, I too had so often thought it a pity, that, in the singular kind of quarrel with myself which I was always carrying on, I was half inclined to shed tears of vexation and distress when Biddy gave utterance to her sentiment and my own.
  • "Which I meantersay, Pip," Joe now observed in a manner that was at once expressive of forcible argumentation, strict confidence, and great politeness, "as I hup and married your sister, and I were at the time what you might call (if you was anyways inclined) a single man."
  • It was so with all of us, but with no one more than Drummle: the development of whose inclination to gird in a grudging and suspicious way at the rest, was screwed out of him before the fish was taken off.
  • So, having come there against my inclination, I went on against it.
  • A stranger would have found them insupportable, and even to me they were so oppressive that I hesitated, half inclined to go back.
  • I never shall forget the radiant face with which he came home one afternoon, and told me, as a mighty piece of news, of his having fallen in with one Clarriker (the young merchant’s name), and of Clarriker’s having shown an extraordinary inclination towards him, and of his belief that the opening had come at last.
  • Then, Drummle glanced at me, with an insolent triumph on his great-jowled face that cut me to the heart, dull as he was, and so exasperated me, that I felt inclined to take him in my arms (as the robber in the story-book is said to have taken the old lady) and seat him on the fire.

  • Show more again
  • And I should be false and base if I did not tell you, whether it is acceptable to you or no, and whether you are inclined to give credence to it or no, that you deeply wrong both Mr. Matthew Pocket and his son Herbert, if you suppose them to be otherwise than generous, upright, open, and incapable of anything designing or mean.

  • There are no more uses of "inclined" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: I'm inclined to Define
a tendency; in the mood; or an attitude that favors something
as in: on an incline or incline his head Define
to be at an angle or to bend
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading