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infirm
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Great Expectations
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infirm
Used In
Great Expectations
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  • However, having an infirmity—for I am hard of hearing, sir—
  • —Yes, hard of hearing; having that infirmity coming upon me, my son he went into the Law, and he took charge of me, and he by little and little made out this elegant and beautiful property.
  • Mr. Wopsle’s great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid two pence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
  • Nothing disturbed the tranquillity of the Castle, but the occasional tumbling open of John and Miss Skiffins: which little doors were a prey to some spasmodic infirmity that made me sympathetically uncomfortable until I got used to it.

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    Show samples from other sources
  • too infirm to walk unassisted
  • age creeps upon them; infirmities follow
    Mark Twain

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