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Great Expectations
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Great Expectations
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  • That person is the person from whom you derive your expectations, and the secret is solely held by that person and by me.
  • As I never saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them (for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies regarding what they were like were unreasonably derived from their tombstones.
  • I derived from this, that Joe’s education, like Steam, was yet in its infancy, Pursuing the subject, I inquired,— "Didn’t you ever go to school, Joe, when you were as little as me?"
  • Biddy was never insulting, or capricious, or Biddy to-day and somebody else to-morrow; she would have derived only pain, and no pleasure, from giving me pain; she would far rather have wounded her own breast than mine.
  • I derived from this speech that Mr. Herbert Pocket (for Herbert was the pale young gentleman’s name) still rather confounded his intention with his execution.
  • We always derived profound satisfaction from making an appointment for this purpose.
  • While he was putting up the other cast and coming down from the chair, the thought crossed my mind that all his personal jewelry was derived from like sources.
  • Years afterwards, I made a dreadful likeness of that woman, by causing a face that had no other natural resemblance to it than it derived from flowing hair to pass behind a bowl of flaming spirits in a dark room.
  • I alluded to the advantages I had derived in my first rawness and ignorance from his society, and I confessed that I feared I had but ill repaid them, and that he might have done better without me and my expectations.
  • I derived that, from the look they interchanged.
  • No wisdom on earth could have given me the comfort that I should have derived from their simplicity and fidelity; but I could never, never, undo what I had done.
  • That the secret must be confided to Herbert as a matter of unavoidable necessity, even if I could have put the immense relief I should derive from sharing it with him out of the question, was plain to me.
  • From this last speech I derived the notion that Miss Havisham, for some reason or no reason, had not taken him into her confidence as to her designing me for Estella; that he resented this, and felt a jealousy about it; or that he really did object to that scheme, and would have nothing to do with it.
  • I sometimes derived an impression, from his manner or from a whispered word or two which escaped him, that he pondered over the question whether he might have been a better man under better circumstances.
  • I never discovered from whom Joe derived the conventional temperature of the four thousand pounds; but it appeared to make the sum of money more to him, and he had a manifest relish in insisting on its being cool.

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  • She likes to win, but she doesn’t derive pleasure from watching others lose.
  • I derive pleasure from my work.

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