To better see all uses of the word
Geneva
in
Frankenstein
please enable javascript.

Geneva
Used In
Frankenstein
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • We possessed a house in Geneva, and a campagne on Belrive, the eastern shore of the lake, at the distance of rather more than a league from the city.
  • Henry Clerval was the son of a merchant of Geneva.
  • A servant in Geneva does not mean the same thing as a servant in France and England.
  • Now, dear Victor, I dare say you wish to be indulged in a little gossip concerning the good people of Geneva.
  • Your favourite schoolfellow, Louis Manoir, has suffered several misfortunes since the departure of Clerval from Geneva.
  • To go instantly to Geneva: come with me, Henry, to order the horses.
  • By degrees the calm and heavenly scene restored me, and I continued my journey towards Geneva.
  • Geneva, March 18, 17—.
  • Geneva, May 12th, 17—.
  • He came like a protecting spirit to the poor girl, who committed herself to his care; and after the interment of his friend he conducted her to Geneva and placed her under the protection of a relation.
  • Two years passed in this manner, during which I paid no visit to Geneva, but was engaged, heart and soul, in the pursuit of some discoveries which I hoped to make.
  • I had hitherto attended the schools of Geneva, but my father thought it necessary for the completion of my education that I should be made acquainted with other customs than those of my native country.
  • It may appear strange that such should arise in the eighteenth century; but while I followed the routine of education in the schools of Geneva, I was, to a great degree, self-taught with regard to my favourite studies.
  • It was completely dark when I arrived in the environs of Geneva; the gates of the town were already shut; and I was obliged to pass the night at Secheron, a village at the distance of half a league from the city.
  • She then related that, by the permission of Elizabeth, she had passed the evening of the night on which the murder had been committed at the house of an aunt at Chene, a village situated at about a league from Geneva.
  • You had mentioned Geneva as the name of your native town, and towards this place I resolved to proceed.
  • But my toils now drew near a close, and in two months from this time I reached the environs of Geneva.
  • Morning dawned before I arrived at the village of Chamounix; I took no rest, but returned immediately to Geneva.
  • Chapter 18 Day after day, week after week, passed away on my return to Geneva; and I could not collect the courage to recommence my work.
  • Summer passed away in these occupations, and my return to Geneva was fixed for the latter end of autumn; but being delayed by several accidents, winter and snow arrived, the roads were deemed impassable, and my journey was retarded until the ensuing spring.
  • She was alarmed by this account and passed several hours in looking for him, when the gates of Geneva were shut, and she was forced to remain several hours of the night in a barn belonging to a cottage, being unwilling to call up the inhabitants, to whom she was well known.
  • The shutting of the gates regularly at ten o’clock and the impossibility of remaining on the lake after that hour had rendered our residence within the walls of Geneva very irksome to me.
  • After passing some months in London, we received a letter from a person in Scotland who had formerly been our visitor at Geneva.
  • I instantly wrote to Geneva; nearly two months have elapsed since the departure of my letter.
  • He talked of Geneva, which I should soon visit, of Elizabeth and Ernest; but these words only drew deep groans from me.
  • I hailed the darkness that shut Ireland from my sight, and my pulse beat with a feverish joy when I reflected that I should soon see Geneva.
  • I expect to see you looking even more ill than when you quitted Geneva.
  • In about a week after the arrival of Elizabeth’s letter we returned to Geneva.
  • I started up and resolved to return to Geneva with all possible speed.
  • My first resolution was to quit Geneva forever; my country, which, when I was happy and beloved, was dear to me, now, in my adversity, became hateful.
  • When I quitted Geneva my first labour was to gain some clue by which I might trace the steps of my fiendish enemy.
  • I repassed, in my memory, my whole life—my quiet happiness while residing with my family in Geneva, the death of my mother, and my departure for Ingolstadt.
  • I arrived at Geneva.
  • The sun had far descended, and I still sat on the shore, satisfying my appetite, which had become ravenous, with an oaten cake, when I saw a fishing-boat land close to me, and one of the men brought me a packet; it contained letters from Geneva, and one from Clerval entreating me to join him.
  • It was necessary that I should return without delay to Geneva, there to watch over the lives of those I so fondly loved and to lie in wait for the murderer, that if any chance led me to the place of his concealment, or if he dared again to blast me by his presence, I might, with unfailing aim, put an end to the existence of the monstrous image which I had endued with the mockery of a soul still more monstrous.
  • "Elizabeth Lavenza "Geneva, May 18th, 17—"

  • There are no more uses of "Geneva" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • Annie had been in Amsterdam, then China, then Japan, then back to Geneva, and so hadn’t had time to focus on Kalden, but the two of them had traded occasional messages about him.
    Dave Eggers  --  The Circle
  • You know as well as I do that the Army adheres to the Geneva Convention.
    David Baldacci  --  Zero Day

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading