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  • My dear son, I entreat you never to make such an assertion again.
  • She had at first yielded to our entreaties, but when she heard that the life of her favourite was menaced, she could no longer control her anxiety.
  • Will no entreaties cause thee to turn a favourable eye upon thy creature, who implores thy goodness and compassion?
  • contained letters from Geneva, and one from Clerval entreating me to join him.
  • Entreating him, therefore, to remain a few minutes at the bottom of the stairs, I darted up towards my own room.
  • Adieu! my cousin; take care of your self; and, I entreat you, write!
  • I must own I felt a little proud when my captain offered me the second dignity in the vessel and entreated me to remain with the greatest earnestness, so valuable did he consider my services.
  • I entreat you to hear me before you give vent to your hatred on my devoted head.
  • I entreat you not to reason with me any more.
  • He saw his mistress once before the destined ceremony; but she was bathed in tears, and throwing herself at his feet, entreated him to spare her, confessing at the same time that she loved another, but that he was poor, and that her father would never consent to the union.
  • He entreated me to write often.
  • This I most earnestly entreat, and I know you will comply.
  • It was said, and we retired under the pretence of seeking repose, each fancying that the other was deceived; but when at morning’s dawn I descended to the carriage which was to convey me away, they were all there—my father again to bless me, Clerval to press my hand once more, my Elizabeth to renew her entreaties that I would write often and to bestow the last feminine attentions on her playmate and friend.
  • He could not any longer delay his departure; but as his journey to London might be followed, even sooner than he now conjectured, by his longer voyage, he entreated me to bestow as much of my society on him as I could spare.
  • I may be absent a month or two; but do not interfere with my motions, I entreat you; leave me to peace and solitude for a short time; and when I return, I hope it will be with a lighter heart, more congenial to your own temper.
  • Sometimes I entreated my attendants to assist me in the destruction of the fiend by whom I was tormented; and at others I felt the fingers of the monster already grasping my neck, and screamed aloud with agony and terror.
  • I passed an hour in this state of mind, when suddenly I reflected how fearful the combat which I momentarily expected would be to my wife, and I earnestly entreated her to retire, resolving not to join her until I had obtained some knowledge as to the situation of my enemy.
  • "You may easily believe," said he, "how great was the difficulty to persuade my father that all necessary knowledge was not comprised in the noble art of book-keeping; and, indeed, I believe I left him incredulous to the last, for his constant answer to my unwearied entreaties was the same as that of the Dutch schoolmaster in The Vicar of Wakefield: ’I have ten thousand florins a year without Greek, I eat heartily without Greek.’

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  • She flattered and entreated him until he agreed to help.
  • She was unmoved by his entreaties.

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