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banish
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Wuthering Heights
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banish
Used In
Wuthering Heights
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  • Banish him from your thoughts, Miss,’ I said.
  • One Sunday evening, it chanced that they were banished from the sitting-room, for making a noise, or a light offence of the kind; and when I went to call them to supper, I could discover them nowhere.
  • On coming back a few days afterwards (for I did not consider my banishment perpetual), I found they had christened him ’Heathcliff’: it was the name of a son who died in childhood, and it has served him ever since, both for Christian and surname.
  • I never would have banished him from her society as long as she desired his.
  • ’Is there some new reason for this banishment?’
  • I desire an explanation: playing and trifling are completely banished out of my mind; and I can’t dance attendance on your affectations now!’
  • ’Oh, indeed; you’re tired of being banished from the world, are you?’ he said.
  • Mr. Heathcliff, who grew more and more disinclined to society, had almost banished Earnshaw from his apartment.

  • There are no more uses of "banish" in the book.


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  • He was banished from his own country.
  • I tried to banish the thought from my mind.

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