To see all instances of the word
presumption
used in
Wuthering Heights
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presumption
Used in
Wuthering Heights
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • I presume you grew weary of the amusement and dropped it, didn't you?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I presume, because, with that face, I'm sure you cannot help being good-hearted.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mr. Hindley had gone from home one afternoon, and Heathcliff presumed to give himself a holiday on the strength of it.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Then the doctor had said that she would not bear crossing much; she ought to have her own way; and it was nothing less than murder in her eyes for any one to presume to stand up and contradict her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Ellen, I was ready to tear my hair off my head! I sobbed and wept so that my eyes were almost blind; and the ruffian you have such sympathy with stood opposite: presuming every now and then to bid me "wisht," and denying that it was his fault; and, finally, frightened by my assertions that I would tell papa, and that he should be put in prison and hanged, he commenced blubbering himself, and hurried out to hide his cowardly agitation.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: presumption of innocence
as in: he is presumptious
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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