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perverse
in
Wuthering Heights
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perverse
Used In
Wuthering Heights
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  • He turned, as he spoke, a peculiar look in her direction: a look of hatred; unless he has a most perverse set of facial muscles that will not, like those of other people, interpret the language of his soul.
  • Catherine had an awfully perverted taste to esteem him so dearly, knowing him so well.
  • A propensity to be saucy was one; and a perverse will, that indulged children invariably acquire, whether they be good tempered or cross.
  • Linton had slid from his seat on to the hearthstone, and lay writhing in the mere perverseness of an indulged plague of a child, determined to be as grievous and harassing as it can.
  • Catherine, by instinct, must have divined it was obdurate perversity, and not dislike, that prompted this dogged conduct; for, after remaining an instant undecided, she stooped and impressed on his cheek a gentle kiss.

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  • She took perverse satisfaction in spoiling his plans.
  • a perverse mood

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