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melancholy
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Wuthering Heights
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melancholy
Used In
Wuthering Heights
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  • The intense horror of nightmare came over me: I tried to draw back my arm, but the hand clung to it, and a most melancholy voice sobbed, ’Let me in — let me in!’
  • I dared hardly lift my eyes from the page before me, that melancholy scene so instantly usurped its place.
  • Time brought resignation, and a melancholy sweeter than common joy.
  • The flash of her eyes had been succeeded by a dreamy and melancholy softness; they no longer gave the impression of looking at the objects around her: they appeared always to gaze beyond, and far beyond — you would have said out of this world.
  • Cathy stared a long time at the lonely blossom trembling in its earthy shelter, and replied, at length — ’No, I’ll not touch it: but it looks melancholy, does it not, Ellen?’
  • She refused; and I unwillingly donned a cloak, and took my umbrella to accompany her on a stroll to the bottom of the park: a formal walk which she generally affected if low-spirited — and that she invariably was when Mr. Edgar had been worse than ordinary, a thing never known from his confession, but guessed both by her and me from his increased silence and the melancholy of his countenance.

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  • Since her dog died she’s been in a melancholy mood.
  • This weather makes me melancholy. I can’t wait for spring,

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