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heed
in
Wuthering Heights
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heed
Used In
Wuthering Heights
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  • She kept wandering to and fro, from the gate to the door, in a state of agitation which permitted no repose; and at length took up a permanent situation on one side of the wall, near the road: where, heedless of my expostulations and the growling thunder, and the great drops that began to plash around her, she remained, calling at intervals, and then listening, and then crying outright.
  • And he must have a fire in the middle of summer; and Joseph’s bacca-pipe is poison; and he must always have sweets and dainties, and always milk, milk for ever — heeding naught how the rest of us are pinched in winter; and there he’ll sit, wrapped in his furred cloak in his chair by the fire, with some toast and water or other slop on the hob to sip at; and if Hareton, for pity, comes to amuse him — Hareton is not bad-natured, though he’s rough — they’re sure to part, one swearing andů
  • Niver heed, Hareton, lad — dunnut be ’feard — he cannot get at thee!"

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  • Heed the advice of the old women.
  • She did not heed his warning.

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