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haggard
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Wuthering Heights
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haggard
Used In
Wuthering Heights
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  • The house-door was ajar, too; light entered from its unclosed windows; Hindley had come out, and stood on the kitchen hearth, haggard and drowsy.
  • The haggardness of Mrs. Linton’s appearance smote him speechless, and he could only glance from her to me in horrified astonishment.
  • ’No — better — better!’ he panted, trembling, and retaining her hand as if he needed its support, while his large blue eyes wandered timidly over her; the hollowness round them transforming to haggard wildness the languid expression they once possessed.
  • Then, the paleness of her face — its haggard aspect having vanished as she recovered flesh — and the peculiar expression arising from her mental state, though painfully suggestive of their causes, added to the touching interest which she awakened; and — invariably to me, I know, and to any person who saw her, I should think — refuted more tangible proofs of convalescence, and stamped her as one doomed to decay.

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  • Rogak had Melody Byrd read a passage: Circe trying to bewitch Odysseus: "Wow you are burnt-out husks, your spirits haggard, sere, always brooding over your wanderings long and hard, your hearts never lifting with any joy— you’ve suffered far too much.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  The Impossible Knife of Memory
  • Their faces were pale and haggard, scratched and bruised.
    James Dashner  --  The Death Cure

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