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used in
Wuthering Heights
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Used in
Wuthering Heights
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  • In winter nothing more dreary, in summer nothing more divine, than those glens shut in by hills, and those bluff, bold swells of heath.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • 'The Lord help us!' he soliloquised in an undertone of peevish displeasure, while relieving me of my horse: looking, meantime, in my face so sourly that I charitably conjectured he must have need of divine aid to digest his dinner, and his pious ejaculation had no reference to my unexpected advent.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • 'No, I'm not hungry,' he answered, averting his head, and speaking rather contemptuously, as if he guessed I was trying to divine the occasion of his good humour.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And I partook of the infinite calm in which she lay: my mind was never in a holier frame than while I gazed on that untroubled image of Divine rest.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: to forgive is divine
as in: divined from tea leaves
as in: divined through intuition
To see an overview of word senses (including some not listed above), click here.

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