To better see all uses of the word
covet
in
Wuthering Heights
please enable javascript.

Go to New Version of This Page
This old version has not been updated since 2016,
but we're leaving it in case you prefer it.
Show What's New
Please update your links from the new version.
covet
Used In
Wuthering Heights
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • It is impossible that you can covet the admiration of Heathcliff — that you consider him an agreeable person!
  • Abstract your mind from the subject at present: you are too prone to covet your neighbour’s goods; remember THIS neighbour’s goods are mine.’
  • He means to offer liberal payment for permission to lodge at the Heights; and doubtless my brother’s covetousness will prompt him to accept the terms: he was always greedy; though what he grasps with one hand he flings away with the other.’
  • He has just come home at dawn, and gone up-stairs to his chamber; looking himself in — as if anybody dreamt of coveting his company!
  • He looked astonished at the expression my face assumed during a brief second: it was not horror, it was covetousness.
  • Compare the present occasion with such an affliction as that, and be thankful for the friends you have, instead of coveting more.’
  • — Do you know that, twenty times a day, I covet Hareton, with all his degradation?

  • There are no more uses of "covet" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • The company makes knockoffs for people who covet designer fashions, but can’t afford them.
  • He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it - namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading