To better see all uses of the word
Wuthering Heights
please enable javascript.

Used In
Wuthering Heights
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
  • I couldn’t bear to witness her sorrow:  to see her pale, dejected countenance, and heavy eyes:

  • There are no more uses of "countenance" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

    Show samples from other sources
  • She has a pleasant countenance.
  • Her countenance grew stern.

  • Go to more samples

unspecified meaning
  • Heathcliff’s countenance relaxed into a grin.
  • Her position before was sheltered from the light; now, I had a distinct view of her whole figure and countenance.

  • Show more
  • She had some reason to put the question, for shame and pride threw double gloom over his countenance, and kept him immovable.
  • ’Yes,’ she answered; ’but he looked better when he was animated; that is his everyday countenance: he wanted spirit in general.’
  • ’That they what?’ cried Catherine, gazing at him with a troubled countenance.
  • She seated herself by me again: her countenance grew sadder and graver, and her clasped hands trembled.
  • That was my first idea on observing an elf-locked, brown-eyed boy setting his ruddy countenance against the bars.
  • His countenance was much older in expression and decision of feature than Mr. Linton’s; it looked intelligent, and retained no marks of former degradation.
  • The apartment and furniture would have been nothing extraordinary as belonging to a homely, northern farmer, with a stubborn countenance, and stalwart limbs set out to advantage in kneebreeches and gaiters.
  • They could not every day sit so grim and taciturn; and it was impossible, however ill-tempered they might be, that the universal scowl they wore was their every-day countenance.

  • Show more again
  • However, having studied for an interval, with a fist on either knee, and a cloud of meditation over her ruddy countenance, she ejaculated — ’Ah, times are greatly changed since then!’
  • A miser who has parted with a lucky lottery ticket for five shillings, and finds next day he has lost in the bargain five thousand pounds, could not show a blanker countenance than he did on beholding the figure of Mr. Earnshaw above.
  • I wish you could dismiss that apathy out of that countenance, and look rather more anxious about me.’
  • I inquired, still preserving my external composure, in spite of her ghastly countenance and strange, exaggerated manner.
  • Trembling and bewildered, she held me fast, but the horror gradually passed from her countenance; its paleness gave place to a glow of shame.
  • And take a good look at that countenance: she’s near the point which would suit me.
  • I exclaimed, concealing my joy under an angry countenance.
  • I do not know whether it was sorrow for him, but his cousin put on as sad a countenance as himself, and returned to her father.
  • I watched to catch his impressions in his countenance.
  • Earnshaw had his countenance completely averted from his companion.
  • ’But how can one little note — ?’ she recommenced, putting on an imploring countenance.
  • I saw nothing for it but to hold my tongue, and suffer matters to take their course; and Kenneth being arrived, I went with a badly composed countenance to announce him.
  • As I sat nursing these reflections, the casement behind me was banged on to the floor by a blow from the latter individual, and his black countenance looked blightingly through.
  • Her present countenance had a wild vindictiveness in its white cheek, and a bloodless lip and scintillating eye; and she retained in her closed fingers a portion of the locks she had been grasping.
  • He tried to wrest the key from Catherine’s grasp, and for safety she flung it into the hottest part of the fire; whereupon Mr. Edgar was taken with a nervous trembling, and his countenance grew deadly pale.
  • Earnshaw looked up, like me, to the countenance of our mutual foe; who, absorbed in his anguish, seemed insensible to anything around him: the longer he stood, the plainer his reflections revealed their blackness through his features.
  • I read in his countenance what anguish it was to offer that sacrifice to spleen.
  • There was a restless, anxious expression in his countenance.
  • ’And he spoke to me,’ she added, with a perplexed countenance.
  • I getten summut else to do,’ he answered, and continued his work; moving his lantern jaws meanwhile, and surveying my dress and countenance (the former a great deal too fine, but the latter, I’m sure, as sad as he could desire) with sovereign contempt.
  • And whatever it was, it communicated, apparently, both pleasure and pain in exquisite extremes: at least the anguished, yet raptured, expression of his countenance suggested that idea.
  • I frowned, and then she glanced towards the master: whose mind was occupied on other subjects than his company, as his countenance evinced; and she grew serious for an instant, scrutinizing him with deep gravity.
  • I overheard no further distinguishable talk, but, on looking round again, I perceived two such radiant countenances bent over the page of the accepted book, that I did not doubt the treaty had been ratified on both sides; and the enemies were, thenceforth, sworn allies.
  • Her countenance grew wan with watching and sorrow, and my master gladly dismissed her to what he flattered himself would be a happy change of scene and society; drawing comfort from the hope that she would not now be left entirely alone after his death.
  • Never did any bird flying back to a plundered nest, which it had left brimful of chirping young ones, express more complete despair, in its anguished cries and flutterings, than she by her single ’Oh!’ and the change that transfigured her late happy countenance.
  • Now, I have the satisfaction of being sure that he detests me, to the point of its annoying him seriously to have me within ear-shot or eyesight: I notice, when I enter his presence, the muscles of his countenance are involuntarily distorted into an expression of hatred; partly arising from his knowledge of the good causes I have to feel that sentiment for him, and partly from original aversion.
  • Mr. Heathcliff paused and wiped his forehead; his hair clung to it, wet with perspiration; his eyes were fixed on the red embers of the fire, the brows not contracted, but raised next the temples; diminishing the grim aspect of his countenance, but imparting a peculiar look of trouble, and a painful appearance of mental tension towards one absorbing subject.
  • She refused; and I unwillingly donned a cloak, and took my umbrella to accompany her on a stroll to the bottom of the park: a formal walk which she generally affected if low-spirited — and that she invariably was when Mr. Edgar had been worse than ordinary, a thing never known from his confession, but guessed both by her and me from his increased silence and the melancholy of his countenance.

  • There are no more uses of "countenance" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading