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demeanor
in
The Scarlet Letter
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demeanor
Used In
The Scarlet Letter
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
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  • And, in so intense a moment his demeanour would have still been calm.
  • With the same hard demeanour, she was led back to prison, and vanished from the public gaze within its iron-clamped portal.
  • Nor did his demeanour change when the withdrawal of the prison keeper left him face to face with the woman, whose absorbed notice of him, in the crowd, had intimated so close a relation between himself and her.
  • Measured by the prisoner’s experience, however, it might be reckoned a journey of some length; for haughty as her demeanour was, she perchance underwent an agony from every footstep of those that thronged to see her, as if her heart had been flung into the street for them all to spurn and trample upon.
  • In either case, there was very much the same solemnity of demeanour on the part of the spectators, as befitted a people among whom religion and law were almost identical, and in whose character both were so thoroughly interfused, that the mildest and severest acts of public discipline were alike made venerable and awful.
  • Even in outward demeanour they showed a stamp of majesty that made the warrior’s haughty stride look vulgar, if not absurd.
  • Nothing was more remarkable than the change which took place, almost immediately after Mr. Dimmesdale’s death, in the appearance and demeanour of the old man known as Roger Chillingworth.
  • So far as a demeanour of natural authority was concerned, the mother country need not have been ashamed to see these foremost men of an actual democracy adopted into the House of Peers, or make the Privy Council of the Sovereign.

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  • a grave demeanor
  • Her calm demeanor belies the inner turmoil.

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Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
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