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convey
used in David Copperfield

16 uses
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?  —16 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • In the evening I started, by that conveyance, down the road I had traversed under so many vicissitudes.
    Chapters 55-57 (8% in)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • My mother was so much worse that Peggotty, coming in with the teaboard and candles, and seeing at a glance how ill she was, — as Miss Betsey might have done sooner if there had been light enough, — conveyed her upstairs to her own room with all speed; and immediately dispatched Ham Peggotty, her nephew, who had been for some days past secreted in the house, unknown to my mother, as a special messenger in case of emergency, to fetch the nurse and doctor.
    Chapters 1-3 (20% in)
  • Peggotty had a basket of refreshments on her knee, which would have lasted us out handsomely, if we had been going to London by the same conveyance.
    Chapters 1-3 (64% in)
  • The length of those five days I can convey no idea of to any one.
    Chapters 4-6 (36% in)
  • It completely conveyed the idea of a man who had been born, not to say with a silver spoon, but with a scaling-ladder, and had gone on mounting all the heights of life one after another, until now he looked, from the top of the fortifications, with the eye of a philosopher and a patron, on the people down in the trenches.
    Chapters 25-27 (19% in)
  • I was at the coach office to take leave of her and see her go; and there was he, returning to Canterbury by the same conveyance.
    Chapters 25-27 (44% in)
  • The mere vehemence of her words can convey, I am sensible, but a weak impression of the passion by which she was possessed, and which made itself articulate in her whole figure, though her voice, instead of being raised, was lower than usual.
    Chapters 31-33 (59% in)
  • I know that my aunt distressed Dora's aunts very much, by utterly setting at naught the dignity of fly-conveyance, and walking out to Putney at extraordinary times, as shortly after breakfast or just before tea; likewise by wearing her bonnet in any manner that happened to be comfortable to her head, without at all deferring to the prejudices of civilization on that subject.
    Chapters 40-42 (49% in)
  • He is called to the bar; and with admirable industry and self-denial has scraped another hundred pounds together, to fee a Conveyancer whose chambers he attends.
    Chapters 43-45 (3% in)
  • I answered the solicitude which his face expressed, by conveying the same expression into my own, and shaking my head.
    Chapters 43-45 (71% in)
  • 'And when I came to you, that night, to lay down all my load of shame and grief, and knew that I had to tell that, underneath your roof, one of my own kindred, to whom you had been a benefactor, for the love of me, had spoken to me words that should have found no utterance, even if I had been the weak and mercenary wretch he thought me — my mind revolted from the taint the very tale conveyed.
    Chapters 43-45 (94% in)
  • 'MY DEAR SIR, 'I beg to be allowed to convey, through you, my apologies to your excellent aunt for my late excitement.
    Chapters 49-51 (30% in)
  • The little elephant set the door of the parlour open, enabling me to see that, in these latter days, it was converted into a bedroom for Mr. Omer who could not be easily conveyed upstairs; and then hid her pretty forehead, and tumbled her long hair, against the back of Mr. Omer's chair.
    Chapters 49-51 (88% in)
  • So soon as I could at all collect my thoughts, I sent for Joram, and begged him to provide me a conveyance in which it could be got to London in the night.
    Chapters 55-57 (44% in)
  • It was not long, before I had almost as many friends in the valley as in Yarmouth: and when I left it, before the winter set in, for Geneva, and came back in the spring, their cordial greetings had a homely sound to me, although they were not conveyed in English words.
    Chapters 58-60 (12% in)
  • The second waiter informed me, in a whisper, that this old gentleman was a retired conveyancer living in the Square, and worth a mint of money, which it was expected he would leave to his laundress's daughter; likewise that it was rumoured that he had a service of plate in a bureau, all tarnished with lying by, though more than one spoon and a fork had never yet been beheld in his chambers by mortal vision.
    Chapters 58-60 (29% in)

There are no more uses of "convey" in David Copperfield.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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