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breech
used in David Copperfield

4 uses
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Definition rear in various senses. It is most commonly used today in the phrase breech birth in reference to a baby who comes out of the birth canal butt-first rather than head-first. More-archaic senses seen in classic literature include:
  • breechcloth — a form of loincloth consisting in a strip of material passed between the thighs and held up in front and behind by a belt or string
  • breeches — pants
  • a cannon's breech — the rear of a gun
  • 'In breeches and gaiters, broad-brimmed hat, grey coat, speckled choker,' said the waiter.
    Chapters 4-6 (52% in)
  • I looked out for Mr. Barkis, but he was not there; and instead of him a fat, short-winded, merry-looking, little old man in black, with rusty little bunches of ribbons at the knees of his breeches, black stockings, and a broad-brimmed hat, came puffing up to the coach window, and said: 'Master Copperfield?'
    Chapters 7-9 (80% in)
  • He coughed to that extent, and his breath eluded all his attempts to recover it with that obstinacy, that I fully expected to see his head go down behind the counter, and his little black breeches, with the rusty little bunches of ribbons at the knees, come quivering up in a last ineffectual struggle.
    Chapters 19-21 (71% in)
  • This waiter, who was middle-aged and spare, looked for help to a waiter of more authority — a stout, potential old man, with a double chin, in black breeches and stockings, who came out of a place like a churchwarden's pew, at the end of the coffee-room, where he kept company with a cash-box, a Directory, a Law-list, and other books and papers.
    Chapters 58-60 (24% in)

There are no more uses of "breech" in David Copperfield.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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