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pecuniary
used in David Copperfield

24 uses
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Definition relating to money
  • 'I have no scruple in saying, in the presence of our friends here, that I am a man who has, for some years, contended against the pressure of pecuniary difficulties.'
    Chapters 16-18 (72% in)
  • Nothing has, as yet, turned up; and it may not surprise you, my dear Master Copperfield, so much as it would a stranger, to know that we are at present waiting for a remittance from London, to discharge our pecuniary obligations at this hotel.
    Chapters 16-18 (77% in)
  • Under these circumstances, alike humiliating to endure, humiliating to contemplate, and humiliating to relate, I have discharged the pecuniary liability contracted at this establishment, by giving a note of hand, made payable fourteen days after date, at my residence, Pentonville, London.
    Chapters 16-18 (82% in)
  • It is not an avocation of a remunerative description — in other words, it does not pay — and some temporary embarrassments of a pecuniary nature have been the consequence.
    Chapters 25-27 (99% in)
  • I am too well aware that when, in the inscrutable decrees of Fate, you were reserved for me, it is possible you may have been reserved for one, destined, after a protracted struggle, at length to fall a victim to pecuniary involvements of a complicated nature.
    Chapters 28-30 (6% in)
  • 'I will not,' said Mrs. Micawber, finishing her punch, and gathering her scarf about her shoulders, preparatory to her withdrawal to my bedroom: 'I will not protract these remarks on the subject of Mr. Micawber's pecuniary affairs.
    Chapters 28-30 (31% in)
  • He gave us to understand that in our children we lived again, and that, under the pressure of pecuniary difficulties, any accession to their number was doubly welcome.
    Chapters 28-30 (33% in)
  • My friend Heep has not fixed the positive remuneration at too high a figure, but he has made a great deal, in the way of extrication from the pressure of pecuniary difficulties, contingent on the value of my services; and on the value of those services I pin my faith.
    Chapters 34-36 (90% in)
  • Under the temporary pressure of pecuniary liabilities, contracted with a view to their immediate liquidation, but remaining unliquidated through a combination of circumstances, I have been under the necessity of assuming a garb from which my natural instincts recoil — I allude to spectacles — and possessing myself of a cognomen, to which I can establish no legitimate pretensions.
    Chapters 34-36 (97% in)
  • 'To leave this metropolis,' said Mr. Micawber, 'and my friend Mr. Thomas Traddles, without acquitting myself of the pecuniary part of this obligation, would weigh upon my mind to an insupportable extent.
    Chapters 34-36 (99% in)
  • He got up to ascertain if the door were close shut, before he replied, in a lower voice: 'My dear Copperfield, a man who labours under the pressure of pecuniary embarrassments, is, with the generality of people, at a disadvantage.
    Chapters 37-39 (64% in)
  • The pecuniary means of meeting our expenses, kept down to the utmost farthing, are obtained from him with great difficulty, and even under fearful threats that he will Settle himself (the exact expression); and he inexorably refuses to give any explanation whatever of this distracting policy.
    Chapters 40-42 (99% in)
  • Allow me to say that I fully defer to the reasonable character of that inquiry, and proceed to develop it; premising that it is not an object of a pecuniary nature.
    Chapters 49-51 (2% in)
  • I had often thought of the Micawbers, but chiefly to wonder what 'pecuniary liabilities' they were establishing in Canterbury, and to recall how shy Mr. Micawber was of me when he became clerk to Uriah Heep.
    Chapters 49-51 (10% in)
  • Where, for the first time in many revolving years, the overwhelming pressure of pecuniary liabilities was not proclaimed, from day to day, by importune voices declining to vacate the passage; where there was no knocker on the door for any creditor to appeal to; where personal service of process was not required, and detainees were merely lodged at the gate!
    Chapters 49-51 (13% in)
  • The victim, from my cradle, of pecuniary liabilities to which I have been unable to respond, I have ever been the sport and toy of debasing circumstances.
    Chapters 52-54 (22% in)
  • Need I say, that it soon became necessary for me to solicit from — HEEP — pecuniary advances towards the support of Mrs. Micawber, and our blighted but rising family?
    Chapters 52-54 (25% in)
  • That Mr. W. has been for years deluded and plundered, in every conceivable manner, to the pecuniary aggrandisement of the avaricious, false, and grasping — HEEP.
    Chapters 52-54 (36% in)
  • 'With respect to the pecuniary assistance enabling us to launch our frail canoe on the ocean of enterprise, I have reconsidered that important business-point; and would beg to propose my notes of hand — drawn, it is needless to stipulate, on stamps of the amounts respectively required by the various Acts of Parliament applying to such securities — at eighteen, twenty-four, and thirty months.
    Chapters 52-54 (69% in)
  • 'Now, I may be wrong in my conclusions; it is very likely that I am, but my individual impression is, that the gulf between my family and Mr. Micawber may be traced to an apprehension, on the part of my family, that Mr. Micawber would require pecuniary accommodation.
    Chapters 52-54 (74% in)
  • Micawber being now on the eve of casting off the pecuniary shackles that have so long enthralled him,' said Mrs. Micawber, 'and of commencing a new career in a country where there is sufficient range for his abilities, — which, in my opinion, is exceedingly important; Mr. Micawber's abilities peculiarly requiring space, — it seems to me that my family should signalize the occasion by coming forward.
    Chapters 52-54 (75% in)
  • Have you posts of profitable pecuniary emolument?
    Chapters 55-57 (86% in)
  • How the emigrants never wrote home, otherwise than cheerfully and hopefully; how Mr. Micawber had actually remitted divers small sums of money, on account of those 'pecuniary liabilities', in reference to which he had been so business-like as between man and man; how Janet, returning into my aunt's service when she came back to Dover, had finally carried out her renunciation of mankind by entering into wedlock with a thriving tavern-keeper; and how my aunt had finally set her seal on...
    Chapters 58-60 (74% in)
  • Suffice it to observe, that it was a masterpiece of eloquence; and that those passages in which he more particularly traced his own successful career to its source, and warned the younger portion of his auditory from the shoals of ever incurring pecuniary liabilities which they were unable to liquidate, brought a tear into the manliest eye present.
    Chapters 63-64 (50% in)

There are no more uses of "pecuniary" in David Copperfield.

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