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gaunt
used in David Copperfield

5 uses
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Definition very thin and bony — often from hunger or as though having been worn to the bone
  • He was a gaunt, sallow young man, with hollow cheeks, and a chin almost as black as Mr. Murdstone's; but there the likeness ended, for his whiskers were shaved off, and his hair, instead of being glossy, was rusty and dry.
    Chapters 4-6 (66% in)
  • Her thinness seemed to be the effect of some wasting fire within her, which found a vent in her gaunt eyes.
    Chapters 19-21 (43% in)
  • I could have wished he had been less obliged to me, for he hovered about me in his gratitude all the rest of the evening; and whenever I said a word to Agnes, was sure, with his shadowless eyes and cadaverous face, to be looking gauntly down upon us from behind.
    Chapters 25-27 (16% in)
  • So surely as I looked towards her, did I see that eager visage, with its gaunt black eyes and searching brow, intent on mine; or passing suddenly from mine to Steerforth's; or comprehending both of us at once.
    Chapters 28-30 (59% in)
  • 'Give Betsey Trotwood's love to Blossom, when you come back; and whatever you do, Trot, never dream of setting Betsey up as a scarecrow, for if I ever saw her in the glass, she's quite grim enough and gaunt enough in her private capacity!'
    Chapters 43-45 (35% in)

There are no more uses of "gaunt" in David Copperfield.

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