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forbearance
used in David Copperfield

6 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition refraining (holding back) from acting

or:

patience, tolerance, or self-control
  • The evening wind made such a disturbance just now, among some tall old elm-trees at the bottom of the garden, that neither my mother nor Miss Betsey could forbear glancing that way.
    Chapters 1-3 (11% in)
  • I asked him what her disposition was: whether it was at all mischievous, and if her sympathies were generally on the right side of things: but, not succeeding in attracting his attention to these questions after two or three attempts, I forbore or forgot to repeat them.
    Chapters 22-24 (39% in)
  • 'Our friend Waterbrook will excuse me if I forbear to explain myself generally, on account of the magnitude of the interests involved.'
    Chapters 25-27 (24% in)
  • I never heard such sweet forbearing kindness expressed in a voice, as she expressed in making this reply.
    Chapters 37-39 (72% in)
  • The Misses Spenlow added that they begged to forbear expressing, 'through the medium of correspondence', an opinion on the subject of Mr. Copperfield's communication; but that if Mr. Copperfield would do them the favour to call, upon a certain day (accompanied, if he thought proper, by a confidential friend), they would be happy to hold some conversation on the subject.
    Chapters 40-42 (20% in)
  • I touched my companion without speaking, and we both forbore to cross after her, and both followed on that opposite side of the way; keeping as quietly as we could in the shadow of the houses, but keeping very near her.
    Chapters 46-48 (39% in)

There are no more uses of "forbearance" in David Copperfield.

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