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divert
used in David Copperfield

8 uses
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Definition to change the direction of something; or to distract someone's attention

or more rarely:  to change the purpose for which something is used — such as an army or funds
  • He had a way of writhing when he wanted to express enthusiasm, which was very ugly; and which diverted my attention from the compliment he had paid my relation, to the snaky twistings of his throat and body.
    Chapters 16-18 (21% in)
  • I had no idea how he employed his time in the interval, beyond a general knowledge that he was very popular in the place, and had twenty means of actively diverting himself where another man might not have found one.
    Chapters 22-24 (2% in)
  • If you was to take to something, sir,' said Mrs. Crupp, 'if you was to take to skittles, now, which is healthy, you might find it divert your mind, and do you good.'
    Chapters 25-27 (78% in)
  • To divert his thoughts from this melancholy subject, I informed Mr. Micawber that I relied upon him for a bowl of punch, and led him to the lemons.
    Chapters 28-30 (7% in)
  • ...and affection, out of every hole in the watering-pot; when I think of him never wandering in that better mind of his to which unhappiness addressed itself, never bringing the unfortunate King Charles into the garden, never wavering in his grateful service, never diverted from his knowledge that there was something wrong, or from his wish to set it right— I really feel almost ashamed of having known that he was not quite in his wits, taking account of the utmost I have done with mine.
    Chapters 40-42 (96% in)
  • That she would never waver in it, never be diverted from it, never relinquish it, while there was any chance of hope.
    Chapters 46-48 (56% in)
  • 'My dear Copperfield,' said Traddles, leaning back in his chair when they were gone, and looking at me with an affection that made his eyes red, and his hair all kinds of shapes, 'I don't make any excuse for troubling you with business, because I know you are deeply interested in it, and it may divert your thoughts.
    Chapters 52-54 (78% in)
  • I found it not difficult, in the excitement of Mr. Chillip's own brain, under his potations of negus, to divert his attention from this topic to his own affairs, on which, for the next half-hour, he was quite loquacious; giving me to understand, among other pieces of information, that he was then at the Gray's Inn Coffee-house to lay his professional evidence before a Commission of Lunacy, touching the state of mind of a patient who had become deranged from excessive drinking.
    Chapters 58-60 (70% in)

There are no more uses of "divert" in David Copperfield.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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