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audacious
used in David Copperfield

5 uses
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Definition bold and daring (inclined to take risks) — especially in violating social convention in a manner that could offend others
  • 'And nice people they were, who had the audacity to call him mad,' pursued my aunt.
    Chapters 13-15 (54% in)
  • 'If there is any Donkey in Dover, whose audacity it is harder to me to bear than another's, that,' said my aunt, striking the table, 'is the animal!'
    Chapters 22-24 (59% in)
  • She was audaciously prejudiced in my favour, and quite unable to understand why I should have any misgivings, or be low-spirited about it.
    Chapters 31-33 (64% in)
  • They went away by one of the London night coaches, and I know no more about him; except that his malevolence to me at parting was audacious.
    Chapters 52-54 (87% in)
  • I came down again to my dinner; and even the slow comfort of the meal, and the orderly silence of the place — which was bare of guests, the Long Vacation not yet being over — were eloquent on the audacity of Traddles, and his small hopes of a livelihood for twenty years to come.
    Chapters 58-60 (28% in)

There are no more uses of "audacious" in David Copperfield.

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