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agitate
used in Middlemarch

45 uses
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Definition
to stir up — emotionally (such as anxiety) or physically (such as shaking)
  • she was in a state of agitation which could not be hidden.
    Book 6 -- The Widow and Wife (7% in)
agitation = emotional unrest
  • Such reasons would have been enough to account for plain dress, quite apart from religious feeling; but in Miss Brooke's case, religion alone would have determined it; and Celia mildly acquiesced in all her sister's sentiments, only infusing them with that common-sense which is able to accept momentous doctrines without any eccentric agitation.
    Book 1 -- Miss Brooke (1% in)
  • After he was gone, Dorothea dwelt with some agitation on this indifference of his; and her mind was much exercised with arguments drawn from the varying conditions of climate which modify human needs, and from the admitted wickedness of pagan despots.
    Book 1 -- Miss Brooke (24% in)
  • Usually she would have been interested about her uncle's merciful errand on behalf of the criminal, but her late agitation had made her absent-minded.
    Book 1 -- Miss Brooke (28% in)
  • Dorothea was still hurt and agitated.
    Book 1 -- Miss Brooke (37% in)
  • Mr. Bulstrode's voice had become a loud and agitated whisper as he said the last words.
    Book 2 -- Old and Young (4% in)
  • He thought of Rosamond and her music only in the second place; and though, when her turn came, he dwelt on the image of her for the rest of his walk, he felt no agitation, and had no sense that any new current had set into his life.
    Book 2 -- Old and Young (40% in)
  • Poor Mr. Casaubon himself was lost among small closets and winding stairs, and in an agitated dimness about the Cabeiri, or in an exposure of other mythologists' ill-considered parallels, easily lost sight of any purpose which had prompted him to these labors.
    Book 2 -- Old and Young (73% in)
  • She was humiliated to find herself a mere victim of feeling, as if she could know nothing except through that medium: all her strength was scattered in fits of agitation, of struggle, of despondency, and then again in visions of more complete renunciation, transforming all hard conditions into duty.
    Book 2 -- Old and Young (74% in)
  • ...inexperienced sensitiveness, it seemed like a catastrophe, changing all prospects; and to Mr. Casaubon it was a new pain, he never having been on a wedding journey before, or found himself in that close union which was more of a subjection than he had been able to imagine, since this charming young bride not only obliged him to much consideration on her behalf (which he had sedulously given), but turned out to be capable of agitating him cruelly just where he most needed soothing.
    Book 2 -- Old and Young (78% in)
  • ...it in his thought to tell her that she ought not to have received young Ladislaw in his absence: but he abstained, partly from the sense that it would be ungracious to bring a new complaint in the moment of her penitent acknowledgment, partly because he wanted to avoid further agitation of himself by speech, and partly because he was too proud to betray that jealousy of disposition which was not so exhausted on his scholarly compeers that there was none to spare in other directions.
    Book 2 -- Old and Young (86% in)
  • Yes—careful against mental agitation of all kinds, and against excessive application.
    Book 3 -- Waiting for Death (67% in)
  • The associations of these letters had been made the more painful by that sudden attack of illness which she felt that the agitation caused by her anger might have helped to bring on: it would be time enough to read them when they were again thrust upon her, and she had had no inclination to fetch them from the library.
    Book 3 -- Waiting for Death (68% in)
  • The triumphant confidence of the Mayor founded on Mr. Featherstone's insistent demand that Fred and his mother should not leave him, was a feeble emotion compared with all that was agitating the breasts of the old man's blood-relations, who naturally manifested more their sense of the family tie and were more visibly numerous now that he had become bedridden.
    Book 3 -- Waiting for Death (82% in)
  • The old man paused with a blank stare for a little while, holding the one key erect on the ring; then with an agitated jerk he began to work with his bony left hand at emptying the tin box before him.
    Book 3 -- Waiting for Death (97% in)
  • She did not like her position—alone with the old man, who seemed to show a strange flaring of nervous energy which enabled him to speak again and again without falling into his usual cough; yet she desired not to push unnecessarily the contradiction which agitated him.
    Book 3 -- Waiting for Death (98% in)
  • But Mary herself began to be more agitated by the remembrance of what she had gone through, than she had been by the reality—questioning those acts of hers which had come imperatively and excluded all question in the critical moment.
    Book 3 -- Waiting for Death (99% in)
  • Mary too was agitated; she was conscious that fatally, without will of her own, she had perhaps made a great difference to Fred's lot.
    Book 4 -- Three Love Problems (17% in)
  • Buyers of the Middlemarch newspapers found themselves in an anomalous position: during the agitation on the Catholic Question many had given up the "Pioneer"—which had a motto from Charles James Fox and was in the van of progress—because it had taken Peel's side about the Papists, and had thus blotted its Liberalism with a toleration of Jesuitry and Baal; but they were ill-satisfied with the "Trumpet," which—since its blasts against Rome, and in the general flaccidity of the public...
    Book 4 -- Three Love Problems (33% in)
  • Meanwhile Dorothea's mind was innocently at work towards the further embitterment of her husband; dwelling, with a sympathy that grew to agitation, on what Will had told her about his parents and grandparents.
    Book 4 -- Three Love Problems (46% in)
  • To his preoccupied mind all subjects were to be approached gently, and she had never since his illness lost from her consciousness the dread of agitating him.
    Book 4 -- Three Love Problems (49% in)
  • In those days the world was agitated about the wondrous doings of Mr. St. John Long, "noblemen and gentlemen" attesting his extraction of a fluid like mercury from the temples of a patient.
    Book 5 -- The Dead Hand (23% in)
  • Even in 1831 Lowick was at peace, not more agitated by Reform than by the solemn tenor of the Sunday sermon.
    Book 5 -- The Dead Hand (41% in)
  • Will's glance had caught Dorothea's as she turned out of the pew, and again she bowed, but this time with a look of agitation, as if she were repressing tears.
    Book 5 -- The Dead Hand (42% in)
  • At this crisis Lydgate was announced, and one of the first things he said was, "I fear you are not so well as you were, Mrs. Casaubon; have you been agitated? allow me to feel your pulse."
    Book 5 -- The Dead Hand (60% in)
  • Then, with an effort to recall subjects not connected with her agitation, she added, abruptly, "You know every one in Middlemarch, I think, Mr. Lydgate.
    Book 5 -- The Dead Hand (60% in)
  • I should have thought it unkind if you had not wished to see me," said Dorothea, her habit of speaking with perfect genuineness asserting itself through all her uncertainty and agitation.
    Book 6 -- The Widow and Wife (7% in)
  • We are told that the oldest inhabitants in Peru do not cease to be agitated by the earthquakes, but they probably see beyond each shock, and reflect that there are plenty more to come.
    Book 6 -- The Widow and Wife (11% in)
  • He could not speak again immediately; but Rosamond did not go on sobbing: she tried to conquer her agitation and wiped away her tears, continuing to look before her at the mantel-piece.
    Book 6 -- The Widow and Wife (59% in)
  • He was already in a state of keen sensitiveness and hardly allayed agitation on the subject of ties in the past, and his presentiments were not agreeable.
    Book 6 -- The Widow and Wife (85% in)
  • The morning after his agitating scene with Bulstrode he wrote a brief letter to her, saying that various causes had detained him in the neighborhood longer than he had expected, and asking her permission to call again at Lowick at some hour which she would mention on the earliest possible day, he being anxious to depart, but unwilling to do so until she had granted him an interview.
    Book 6 -- The Widow and Wife (89% in)
  • But the mixture of anger in her agitation had vanished at the sight of him; she had been used, when they were face to face, always to feel confidence and the happy freedom which comes with mutual understanding, and how could other people's words hinder that effect on a sudden?
    Book 6 -- The Widow and Wife (94% in)
  • The power he longed for could not be represented by agitated fingers clutching a heap of coin, or by the half-barbarous, half-idiotic triumph in the eyes of a man who sweeps within his arms the ventures of twenty chapfallen companions.
    Book 7 -- Two Temptations (32% in)
  • Excuse me—I am agitated—I am the victim of this abandoned man.
    Book 7 -- Two Temptations (62% in)
  • She began to have an agitating certainty that the misfortune was something more than the mere loss of money, being keenly sensitive to the fact that Selina now, just as Mrs. Hackbutt had done before, avoided noticing what she said about her husband, as they would have avoided noticing a personal blemish.
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (17% in)
  • Bulstrode, who knew that his wife had been out and had come in saying that she was not well, had spent the time in an agitation equal to hers.
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (19% in)
  • Even in her most uneasy moments—even when she had been agitated by Mrs. Cadwallader's painfully graphic report of gossip—her effort, nay, her strongest impulsive prompting, had been towards the vindication of Will from any sullying surmises; and when, in her meeting with him afterwards, she had at first interpreted his words as a probable allusion to a feeling towards Mrs. Lydgate which he was determined to cut himself off from indulging, she had had a quick, sad, excusing vision of...
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (40% in)
  • Rosamond in her agitated absorption had not noticed the silently advancing figure; but when Dorothea, after the first immeasurable instant of this vision, moved confusedly backward and found herself impeded by some piece of furniture, Rosamond was suddenly aware of her presence, and with a spasmodic movement snatched away her hands and rose, looking at Dorothea who was necessarily arrested.
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (45% in)
  • He perceived the difference in a moment, and seating himself by her put his arm gently under her, and bending over her said, "My poor Rosamond! has something agitated you?"
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (50% in)
  • No—only a slight nervous shock—the effect of some agitation.
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (51% in)
  • That she colored and gave rather a startled movement did not surprise him after the agitation produced by the interview yesterday—a beneficent agitation, he thought, since it seemed to have made her turn to him again.
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (61% in)
  • That she colored and gave rather a startled movement did not surprise him after the agitation produced by the interview yesterday—a beneficent agitation, he thought, since it seemed to have made her turn to him again.
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (61% in)
  • She was too much preoccupied with her own anxiety, to be aware that Rosamond was trembling too; and filled with the need to express pitying fellowship rather than rebuke, she put her hands on Rosamond's, and said with more agitated rapidity,—"I know, I know that the feeling may be very dear—it has taken hold of us unawares—it is so hard, it may seem like death to part with it—and we are weak—I am weak—"
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (67% in)
  • She stopped in speechless agitation, not crying, but feeling as if she were being inwardly grappled.
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (67% in)
  • Celia's rare tears had got into her eyes, and the corners of her mouth were agitated.
    Book 8 -- Sunset and Sunrise (91% in)

There are no more uses of "agitate" in Middlemarch.

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