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derive
used in Moby Dick

17 uses
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Definition to get something from something else

(If the context doesn't otherwise indicate where something came from, it is generally from reasoning—especially deductive reasoning.)
  • His grand distinguishing feature, the fin, from which he derives his name, is often a conspicuous object.
    Chapters 31-33 -- Queen Mab; Cetology; The Specksnyder (44% in)
  • Some centuries ago, when the Sperm whale was almost wholly unknown in his own proper individuality, and when his oil was only accidentally obtained from the stranded fish; in those days spermaceti, it would seem, was popularly supposed to be derived from a creature identical with the one then known in England as the Greenland or Right Whale.
    Chapters 31-33 -- Queen Mab; Cetology; The Specksnyder (36% in)
  • And so the appellation must at last have come to be bestowed upon the whale from which this spermaceti was really derived.
    Chapters 31-33 -- Queen Mab; Cetology; The Specksnyder (38% in)
  • Now, if to this consideration you superadd the official supremacy of a ship-master, then, by inference, you will derive the cause of that peculiarity of sea-life just mentioned.
    Chapters 34-36 -- The Cabin-Table; The Mast-Head; The Qarter-Deck--Ahab and all (8% in)
  • ...festival of their theology, that spotless, faithful creature being held the purest envoy they could send to the Great Spirit with the annual tidings of their own fidelity; and though directly from the Latin word for white, all Christian priests derive the name of one part of their sacred vesture, the alb or tunic, worn beneath the cassock; and though among the holy pomps of the Romish faith, white is specially employed in the celebration of the Passion of our Lord; though in the Vision...
    Chapters 40-42 -- Midnight, Forecastle; Moby Dick; The Whiteness of the Whale (65% in)
  • To be sure the same sound was that very moment perhaps being heard all over the seas, from hundreds of whalemen's look-outs perched as high in the air; but from few of those lungs could that accustomed old cry have derived such a marvellous cadence as from Tashtego the Indian's.
    Chapters 46-48 -- Surmises; The Mat-Maker; The First Lowering (27% in)
  • These temporary apprehensions, so vague but so awful, derived a wondrous potency from the contrasting serenity of the weather, in which, beneath all its blue blandness, some thought there lurked a devilish charm, as for days and days we voyaged along, through seas so wearily, lonesomely mild, that all space, in repugnance to our vengeful errand, seemed vacating itself of life before our urn-like prow.
    Chapters 49-51 -- The Hyena; Ahab's Boat and Crew - Fedallah; The Spirit-Spout (77% in)
  • Of course, he never had the benefit of a whaling voyage (such men seldom have), but whence he derived that picture, who can tell?
    Chapters 55-57 -- Monstrous Pictures of Whales; Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales; Whales in Paint…. (29% in)
  • But it may be fancied, that from the naked skeleton of the stranded whale, accurate hints may be derived touching his true form.
    Chapters 55-57 -- Monstrous Pictures of Whales; Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales; Whales in Paint…. (37% in)
  • And the only mode in which you can derive even a tolerable idea of his living contour, is by going a whaling yourself; but by so doing, you run no small risk of being eternally stove and sunk by him.
    Chapters 55-57 -- Monstrous Pictures of Whales; Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales; Whales in Paint…. (44% in)
  • He has but one picture of whaling scenes, and this is a sad deficiency, because it is by such pictures only, when at all well done, that you can derive anything like a truthful idea of the living whale as seen by his living hunters.
    Chapters 55-57 -- Monstrous Pictures of Whales; Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales; Whales in Paint…. (51% in)
  • Akin to the adventure of Perseus and Andromeda—indeed, by some supposed to be indirectly derived from it—is that famous story of St. George and the Dragon; which dragon I maintain to have been a whale; for in many old chronicles whales and dragons are strangely jumbled together, and often stand for each other.
    Chapters 82-84 -- The Honour and Glory of Whaling; Jonah Historically Regarded; Pitchpoling (12% in)
  • But, by the best contradictory authorities, this Grecian story of Hercules and the whale is considered to be derived from the still more ancient Hebrew story of Jonah and the whale; and vice versa; certainly they are very similar.
    Chapters 82-84 -- The Honour and Glory of Whaling; Jonah Historically Regarded; Pitchpoling (31% in)
  • On the contrary, those motions derive their most appalling beauty from it.
    Chapters 85-87 -- The Fountain; The Tail; The Grand Armada (28% in)
  • His title, schoolmaster, would very naturally seem derived from the name bestowed upon the harem itself, but some have surmised that the man who first thus entitled this sort of Ottoman whale, must have read the memoirs of Vidocq, and informed himself what sort of a country-schoolmaster that famous Frenchman was in his younger days, and what was the nature of those occult lessons he inculcated into some of his pupils.
    Chapters 88-90 -- Schools and Schoolmasters; Fast-Fish and Loose-Fish; Heads or Tails (23% in)
  • Here palms, alpacas, and volcanoes; sun's disks and stars; ecliptics, horns-of-plenty, and rich banners waving, are in luxuriant profusion stamped; so that the precious gold seems almost to derive an added preciousness and enhancing glories, by passing through those fancy mints, so Spanishly poetic.
    Chapters 97-99 -- The Lamp; Stowing Down & Clearing Up; Doubloon (47% in)
  • The English were preceded in the whale fishery by the Hollanders, Zealanders, and Danes; from whom they derived many terms still extant in the fishery; and what is yet more, their fat old fashions, touching plenty to eat and drink.
    Chapters 100-102 -- The Pequod meets….; The Decanter; A Bower in the Arsacides (60% in)

There are no more uses of "derive" in Moby Dick.

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