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wither
used in Wuthering Heights

3 uses
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Definition
to shrivel (wrinkle and contract — usually from lack of water)

or:

to become weaker; or feel humiliated
  • I'm not wandering: you're mistaken, or else I should believe you really WERE that withered hag, and I should think I WAS under Penistone Crags; and I'm conscious it's night, and there are two candles on the table making the black press shine like jet.'
    Chapter 12 (25% in)
  • I gazed long at the weather-worn block; and, stooping down, perceived a hole near the bottom still full of snail-shells and pebbles, which we were fond of storing there with more perishable things; and, as fresh as reality, it appeared that I beheld my early playmate seated on the withered turf: his dark, square head bent forward, and his little hand scooping out the earth with a piece of slate.
    Chapter 11 (6% in)
  • On an afternoon in October, or the beginning of November — a fresh watery afternoon, when the turf and paths were rustling with moist, withered leaves, and the cold blue sky was half hidden by clouds — dark grey streamers, rapidly mounting from the west, and boding abundant rain — I requested my young lady to forego her ramble, because I was certain of showers.
    Chapter 22 (9% in)

There are no more uses of "wither" in Wuthering Heights.

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