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recoil
used in Wuthering Heights

4 uses
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Definition
to move backward suddenly — especially:
  • the backward jerk of a gun or cannon when it is fired
  • when a person draws back from someone or something, as with fear, disgust, or pain
  • He would have recoiled still more had he been aware that her attachment rose unsolicited, and was bestowed where it awakened no reciprocation of sentiment; for the minute he discovered its existence he laid the blame on Heathcliff's deliberate designing.
    Chapter 10 (61% in)
  • Catherine and he were constant companions still at his seasons of respite from labour; but he had ceased to express his fondness for her in words, and recoiled with angry suspicion from her girlish caresses, as if conscious there could be no gratification in lavishing such marks of affection on him.
    Chapter 8 (53% in)
  • ' "I'm weary of enduring now," I replied; "and I'd be glad of a retaliation that wouldn't recoil on myself; but treachery and violence are spears pointed at both ends; they wound those who resort to them worse than their enemies."
    Chapter 17 (33% in)
  • Hareton recoiled, looking as foolish as he could do: he sat down in the settle very quiet, and she continued turning over her volumes another half hour; finally, Earnshaw crossed over, and whispered to me.
    Chapter 30 (77% in)

There are no more uses of "recoil" in Wuthering Heights.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia - Recoil (gun)