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grievous
used in The Scarlet Letter

6 uses
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Definition very serious; or very bad; or causing grief
  • "People say," said another, "that the Reverend Master Dimmesdale, her godly pastor, takes it very grievously to heart that such a scandal should have come upon his congregation."
    Chapter 2 -- The Market Place (22% in)
  • I have met with grievous mishaps by sea and land, and have been long held in bonds among the heathen-folk to the southward; and am now brought hither by this Indian to be redeemed out of my captivity.
    Chapter 3 -- The Recognition (18% in)
  • Knowing your natural temper better than I, he could the better judge what arguments to use, whether of tenderness or terror, such as might prevail over your hardness and obstinacy, insomuch that you should no longer hide the name of him who tempted you to this grievous fall.
    Chapter 3 -- The Recognition (60% in)
  • Tomorrow would bring its own trial with it; so would the next day, and so would the next: each its own trial, and yet the very same that was now so unutterably grievous to be borne.
    Chapter 5 -- Hester at her Needle (8% in)
  • "There goes a woman," resumed Roger Chillingworth, after a pause, "who, be her demerits what they may, hath none of that mystery of hidden sinfulness which you deem so grievous to be borne.
    Chapter 10 -- The Leech and his Patient (61% in)
  • And now, rather than have had this grievous wrong to confess, she would gladly have laid down on the forest leaves, and died there, at Arthur Dimmesdale's feet.
    Chapter 17 -- The Pastor and his Parishioner (46% in)

There are no more uses of "grievous" in The Scarlet Letter.

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